Geological_II_notes

Geological_II_notes - DSM 2000 1 DSM 2000 The above slide...

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1 March 30, 2010 DSM 2000
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The above slide lists basic statistics on earthquake occurrence and frequency. 2 March 30, 2010 DSM 2000
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3 The most intense earthquake in recorded history occurred in 1960 in southern Chile (Valdivia-Puerto Montt). Although the strongest, recorded earthquake, it was not the deadliest. The event killed 1,655 killed people, injured 3,000 and made 2 million people homeless. The damage was estimated at $550 million. The majority of deaths occurred in association with the earthquake-generated tsunami. The tsunami waves reached Hawaii were caused 61 deaths and $75 million in damages (plus Japan 138 deaths, $50 million in damages; Philippines: 32 deaths; U.S.: $500,000 in damages). The largest U.S. earthquake occurred only a few years later in the Prince William Sound in Alaska. It was also a combined earthquake and tsunami event killing 128 people – 15 died from the earthquake and 113 from the tsunami. Property loss was estimated at $311 million. The heaviest damage occurred in Anchorage, 120 km northwest of the epicenter where not only shaking but landslides contributed to the devastation. March 30, 2010 DSM 2000
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Earthquakes that occurred this year are highlighted in red. Records highlighted in orange show major earthquakes since 2000. The deadliest earthquake occurred near Huaxian, Shaanxi (formerly Shensi), China, about 50 miles (80 km) east-northeast of Xi'an, the capital of Shaanxi. More than 830,000 people were killed. Damage extended as far away as Taiyuan, the capital of Shanxi (formerly Shansi) and about 270 miles (430 km) northeast of the epicenter. The earthquake was reportedly felt more than 500 miles (800 km) away. The 2004 Sumatra earthquake represents the third largest earthquake in the world since 1900 and is the largest since the 1964 Prince William Sound, Alaska earthquake. The tsunami caused more casualties than any other in recorded history and was recorded nearly world-wide on tide gauges in the Indian, Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. For more information on the Indian Ocean tsunami see slides below. The most recent, major earthquake occurred in January 2010 in Haiti. According to official estimates, 222,570 people killed, 300,000 injured, 1.3 million displaced, 97,294 houses destroyed and 188,383 damaged in the Port-au-Prince area and in much of southern Haiti. This includes at least 4 people killed by a local tsunami in the Petit Paradis area near Leogane. Tsunami waves were also reported at Jacmel, Les Cayes, Petit Goave, Leogane, Luly and Anse a Galets. The tsunami had recorded wave heights (peak-to-trough) of 12 cm at Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic and 2 cm at Christiansted, US Virgin Islands. Uplift was observed along the coast from Leogane to L'Acul and subsidence was observed along the coast from Grand Trou to Port Royal. Source: http://earthquake.usgs.gov/regional/world/most_destructive.php
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Geological_II_notes - DSM 2000 1 DSM 2000 The above slide...

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