Lecture 18. Memory (III) posted

Lecture 18. Memory (III) posted - Introduction to...

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Unformatted text preview: Introduction to Psychology PSYC 1001, Section E Wednesday, November 26, 2008 Memory, Part III (Ch. 7) Language, Part I (Ch. 8) F 4 B Todays class (Objectives) Ch. 7: Memory (Part III) Retrieval Forgetting Physiology of Memory Whats in Memory? Ch. 8: Language (Part I) Some Basics Important Reminder: The final exam will cover material from Ch. 5, 6, 7, and 8 (up to and including p. 325 ) & the accompanying lecture material (slides) You are not responsible for the rest of Ch. 8 (i.e., problem-solving & decision-making) Retrieval Getting information out of memory Tip-of-the-tongue phenomenon Retrieval cues Encoding specficity Reconstructive nature of memory Distortions ; factual errors/impossibilities Schemas what we expect (based on past experience) We reconstruct the past Misinformation effect (Loftus): New (misleading) information can lead to reconstructive distortions (mis)leading information Verbal (e.g., leading questions) Visual imagery Misinformation Effect Loftus & Palmer (1974): Will post-event misinformation (i.e., leading questions) alter eyewitness memory? N = 52; 5 groups How fast were the cars going when they contacted , hit , bumped , collided , or smashed each other? The Misinformation Effect C o n t a c t e d H i t B u m p e d C o l l i d e d S m a s h e d Mean Speed Estimate (mph) The Misinformation Effect Was there any broken glass in the accident? The Misinformation Effect Was there any broken glass in the accident? The Misinformation Effect What mechanism(s) accounts for this effect? Simple interference (retroactive) Overwriting mechanism (Loftus) Source-monitoring error: A memory derived from one source is misattributed to another source You can access both the original memory (e.g., no broken glass) and the altered memory [e.g., broken glass due to (mis)leading information], but have difficulty telling to two apart Source Monitoring Source monitoring: The process of making attributions about the origins of memories Michelangelo? Retrieval Shacter (1999): Imperfections of memory may be adaptive ???...
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Lecture 18. Memory (III) posted - Introduction to...

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