Lecture 21. Monday Sept 21

Lecture 21. Monday Sept 21 - Introduction to Psychology...

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Introduction to Psychology PSYC 1001, Section E
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Announcements/Reminders New/updated on our website Guest lecture slides (Freudian Theory) The scientific legacy of S. Freud (Supplementary) Today’s lecture slides Updated information re: Mass Testing Coming soon to the website… Practice quiz Tips for multiple choice exams Extended office hours (Instructor) Drop-in office hours/exam help (TA – A. Burke)
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Academic Accommodations If you require accommodation for the upcoming midterm (Monday, Sept. 29) and haven’t yet contacted the PMC, please see me after class.
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Today’s class From chapter 1 (textbook) Looking at perspectives: an example Major research areas in contemporary psychology Principal fields of applied psychology today From chapter 2: Research in psychology The scientific approach to behaviour Goals of the scientific enterprise Steps in a scientific investigation Advantages of the scientific approach Experimental research IVs, DVs, extraneous variables; experimental & control groups; experimental design; advantages & disadvantages
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Major perspectives in contemporary psychology Psychologists approach the study of behaviour in many different ways Perspectives impact: Assumptions made (conceptions of human nature) Questions asked (i.e., topics studied) Methods implemented (e.g., genetic manipulations) Many psychologists adopt an eclectic approach Contemporary perspectives: Biological, Evolutionary, Cognitive, Psychodynamic, Humanistic, & Behavioural
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Example: Depression Major depressive disorder (major/clinical depression) Characterized by a combination of symptoms that interfere with a person's ability to work, sleep, study, eat, and enjoy once–pleasurable activities. Major depression is disabling and interferes with normal functioning Vs. The occasional blues/sadness One of the most common psychological/mood disorders (Life-time prevalence of 20–30%; Kruijshaar et al. , 2005) Looking at depression from different perspectives…
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Depression: Biological perspective Organic brain syndrome (e.g., Kaimal and Nair, 2005) Structural changes: Volume of certain brain regions Vasculature changes: Blood flow in certain brain regions Disturbed sleep/wakefulness brain rhythms Neurotransmitter imbalance (e.g., Serotonin) Hormonal imbalance (e.g., Hypercortisolemia) Neuro-immune mechanisms (inflammatory cells/compounds in the brain) Genetics: Depression tends to run in families Genetic polymorphisms (i.e., allelic variations) E.g., Hyperactive amygdala (emotional functions)
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Depression: Evolutionary perspective Is depression an evolved mechanism of distress? Does it serve an adaptive purpose? Communicating a need for help
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This note was uploaded on 04/04/2010 for the course 32611 PSYC 1001 taught by Professor Darcylitteljohn during the Fall '08 term at Carleton CA.

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Lecture 21. Monday Sept 21 - Introduction to Psychology...

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