EE357Unit3_FP

EE357Unit3_FP - © Mark Redekopp All rights reserved EE 357...

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Unformatted text preview: © Mark Redekopp, All rights reserved EE 357 Unit 3 IEEE 754 Floating Point Representation Floating Point Arithmetic © Mark Redekopp, All rights reserved Floating Point • Used to represent very small numbers (fractions) and very large numbers – Avogadro‟s Number: +6.0247 * 10 23 – Planck‟s Constant: +6.6254 * 10-27 – Note: 32 or 64- bit integers can‟t represent this range • Floating Point representation is used in HLL‟s like C by declaring variables as float or double © Mark Redekopp, All rights reserved Fixed Point • Unsigned and 2‟s complement fall under a category of representations called “Fixed Point” • The radix point is assumed to be in a fixed location for all numbers – Integers: 10011101. (binary point to right of LSB) • For 32-bits, unsigned range is 0 to ~4 billion – Fractions: .10011101 (binary point to left of MSB) • Range [0 to 1) • Main point: By fixing the radix point, we limit the range of numbers that can be represented – Floating point allows the radix point to be in a different location for each value © Mark Redekopp, All rights reserved Floating Point Representation • Similar to scientific notation used with decimal numbers – ± D.DDD * 10 ± exp • Floating Point representation uses the following form – ± b.bbbb * 2 ± exp – 3 Fields: sign, exponent, fraction (also called mantissa or significand) S Exp. fraction Overall Sign of # © Mark Redekopp, All rights reserved Normalized FP Numbers • Decimal Example – +0.754*10 15 is not correct scientific notation – Must have exactly one significant digit before decimal point: +7.54*10 14 • In binary the only significant digit is „1‟ • Thus normalized FP format is: ± 1.bbbbbb * 2 ± exp • FP numbers will always be normalized before being stored in memory or a reg. – The 1. is actually not stored but assumed since we always will store normalized numbers – If HW calculates a result of 0.001101*2 5 it must normalize to 1.101000*2 2 before storing © Mark Redekopp, All rights reserved IEEE Floating Point Formats • Single Precision (32-bit format) – 1 Sign bit (0=p/1=n) – 8 Exponent bits (Excess-127 representation) – 23 fraction (significand or mantissa) bits – Equiv. Decimal Range: 7 digits x 10 ± 38 • Double Precision (64-bit format) – 1 Sign bit (0=p/1=n) – 11 Exponent bits (Excess-1023 representation) – 52 fraction (significand or mantissa) bits – Equiv. Decimal Range: 16 digits x 10 ± 308 S Fraction Exp. 1 8 23 S Fraction Exp. 1 11 52 © Mark Redekopp, All rights reserved Exponent Representation • Exponent includes its own sign (+/-) • Rather than using 2‟s comp. system, Single-Precision uses Excess-127 while Double-Precision uses Excess-1023 – This representation allows FP numbers to be easily compared • Let E‟ = stored exponent code and E = true exponent value • For single- precision: E‟ = E + 127 – 2 1 => E = 1, E‟ = 128 10 = 10000000 2 • For double- precision: E‟ = E + 1023...
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This note was uploaded on 04/04/2010 for the course EE 357 taught by Professor Mayeda during the Spring '08 term at USC.

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EE357Unit3_FP - © Mark Redekopp All rights reserved EE 357...

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