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Class3_slides - Physical Electronics EE.338 Class 3 Steve...

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Steve Cronin University of Southern California Electrical Engineering - Electrophysics Physical Electronics EE.338 Class 3
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Chapter 2: (Quantum) Theory of Solids
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Allowed energies in the hydrogen atom. Higher energies occur increasingly close to each other, approaching the vacuum level. 44 2 222 4 , 1 ; ( ) 22 ( 4 ) ( 4 ) 2(4 ) kn pn p n vac oo tot n vac o mq mq Em v E E r E nn mq EE n πε == = = =− hh h Quantized Energy Levels in Atoms
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Atomic Orbitals
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Formation of Bands When two atomic wavefunctions overlap, their electron energy levels split. When many atomic wavefunctions overlap, their electron energy levels split to form a band .
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Electronic Energy Bands in Solids In a semiconductor, the spaces between the bands form a bandgap . The energy of the bandgap is denoted by E g .
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Electronic Energy Bands in Solids In a semiconductor, the spaces between the bands form a bandgap . The energy of the bandgap is denoted by E g .
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Insulating vs. Conducting Semiconductor Insulating Conducting
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Electrons vs. Holes
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Electrons vs. Holes Balloon Analogy A balloon in a car moves in the opposite direction as the driver, when the car accelerates/decelerates. Balloon behaves as though it has negative mass.
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Electrons Move Against the E -Field E
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Holes Move With the E -Field - E Pauli Exclusion Principle: states can only be occupied by one electron. They can only move into an empty state.
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This note was uploaded on 04/04/2010 for the course EE 338 taught by Professor Dapkus during the Spring '07 term at USC.

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Class3_slides - Physical Electronics EE.338 Class 3 Steve...

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