biocompatible nanotubes and toxicology (1)

biocompatible nanotubes and toxicology (1) - Chapter 12...

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Chapter 12 Pharmacological Applications of Biocompatible Carbon Nanotubes and Their Emerging Toxicology Issues* Tae-Joon Park 1 , Jeffrey G. Martin 2,3 , and Robert J. Linhardt 1,2,3 Abstract Since their discovery in 1991, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been studied for their application as diagnostic tools, chemical sensors, and vectors for drug delivery. Carbon nanotubes are of great interest because of their unique array of physical and chemical properties, including their high aspect ratio, ultralight weight, high mechani- cal strength, high electrical conductivity, high thermal conductivity, and high surface area. The unique properties of carbon nanotubes also raise substantial concern about their potentially toxic effects on the environment and human health. This review focuses on the current pharmacological applications and emerging toxicology issues of biocompatible carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes as agents for drug delivery, cancer therapeutics, along with their in vivo challenges and potential toxicity are discussed. Keywords carbon nanotubes, biomaterials, biocompatibility, toxicity, nanomaterials 12.1 Introduction 12.1.1 Historical Overview of Bio-Nanomaterials Biomaterials can be defined as any nondrug material that can be used to treat, enhance, or replace any tissue, organ, or function in an organism. Biomaterials also F. Cataldo, T. Da Ros (eds.) Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacological 283 Potential of Fullerenes and Carbon Nanotubes, © Springer Science + Business Media B.V. 2008 1 Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Biotech Center 4005, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY 12180-3590, USA 2 Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Biotech Center 4005, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY 12180-3590, USA 3 Department of Biology, Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Biotech Center 4005, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY 12180-3590, USA * In Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacological Potential of Fullerenes and Carbon Nanotubes , Franco Cataldo and Tatiana Da Ros (eds.), Springer Vol. 1, Topics in Carbon Materials Chemistry and Physics, 2007.
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284 T.-J. Park et al. refer to biologically derived materials that are used for their structural rather than their biological properties. Collagen, the protein found in bones and connective tis- sues, is an example of a biologically derived biomaterial that can be used as a cos- metic ingredient. Even though the term “biomaterial” did not even exist until 50 years ago, crude biomaterials have been used since the earliest days of human civi- lization (Ratner et al., 2004). This historical overview touches on some highlights in biomaterials leading to the biomedical application of carbon nanotubes.
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This note was uploaded on 04/04/2010 for the course EE 338 taught by Professor Dapkus during the Spring '07 term at USC.

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biocompatible nanotubes and toxicology (1) - Chapter 12...

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