Scott_Handout5 - 2/26/2010 MCB 104; Handout #5 1. Professor...

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2/26/2010 MCB 104; Handout #5 1. Professor Dernburg’s slides list six hallmarks of cancer cells. Know them. Think about experiments you could do to see if a cell had acquired each of those hallmark properties. For example: A. You are culturing mammalian cells on a petri dish. You mutagenize the cells. How can you identify mutant cells that are no longer subject to contact inhibition? B. You are studying mammalian cells, which normally undergo apoptosis in response to massive DNA damage, which can be induced by chemicals or radiation. How can you identify mutant cells that do initiate apoptosis in response to DNA damage? C. What microscopy techniques can you use to identify cells with lots of genomic instability? 2. The multi-hit hypothesis holds that cancer causing mutations accumulate over time in somatic cells, until a malignant cell has such a growth advantage over its neighbors that it divides like crazy. Would a wild-type cell become cancerous as soon as it becomes immortalized (i.e. can divide and divide without senescence)?
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Scott_Handout5 - 2/26/2010 MCB 104; Handout #5 1. Professor...

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