Lec_8_Parasites - Type III Secretion System Complex protein...

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Type III Secretion System Complex protein secretion system employed by many Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria Transport bacterial effector proteins across three membrane barriers into eukaryotic host cytoplasm The effector proteins delivered by TTSS are capable of modulating and interfering with the host cellular processes, plague, typhoid fever, bacterial dysentery Composed of more than 20 structural proteins, effector proteins, and chaperones.
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Recombinant DNA NIH established the RAC (recombinant DNA Advisory Panel) in 1974 in response to concerns over safety of manipulating genetic material using recombinant DNA techniques. The RAC issues recommendations to NIH Director that are then conveyed through NIH OBA (Office of Biotechnology Activities) in the form of NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules http://oba.od.nih.gov/rdna/nih_guidelines_oba.html Mandatory compliance for all institutions receiving NIH funds for Research involving recombinant DNA
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Recombinant DNA Recombinant DNA molecules are either: 1) molecules which are constructed outside living cells by joining natural or synthetic DNA segments to DNA molecules that can replicate in a living cell; or 2) DNA molecules that result from the replication of those described in 1). Synthetic DNA segments which are likely to yield a potentially harmful polynucleotide or polypeptide (e.g., a toxin or a pharmacologically active agent) are considered as equivalent to their natural DNA counterpart. – However,if the synthetic DNA segment is not expressed in vivo as a biologically active polynucleotide or polypeptide product, it is exempt from the NIH Guidelines . Genomic DNA of plants and bacteria that have acquired a transposable element, even if the latter was donated from a recombinant vector no longer present, are not subject to the NIH Guidelines unless the transposon itself contains recombinant DNA.
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IBC Approval Principal Investigator must submit a registration document to the Institutional Biosafety Committee which contains the following information: (i) the source(s) of DNA; (ii) the nature of the inserted DNA sequences; (iii) the host(s) and vector(s) to be used; (iv) if an attempt will be made to obtain expression of a foreign gene, and if so, indicate the protein that will be produced; and (v) the containment conditions that will be implemented as specified in the NIH Guidelines
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Required Approval § III-A. Experiments that Require Institutional Biosafety Committee Approval, RAC Review, and NIH Director Approval Before Initiation The deliberate transfer of a drug resistance trait to microorganisms that are not known to acquire the trait naturally § III-B. Experiments That Require NIH/OBA and Institutional Biosafety Committee Approval Before Initiation Deliberate formation of recombinant DNA containing genes for the biosynthesis of toxin molecules lethal for vertebrates at an LD50 of less than 100 nanograms per
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Lec_8_Parasites - Type III Secretion System Complex protein...

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