4A575846d01 - Running head: CRISIS MANAGEMENT The end of...

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Running head: CRISIS MANAGEMENT The end of innocence: Lessons learned from crisis management of the September 11 terrorist attack Greg Brack, Catherine J. Brack, Michele Hill, Marolyn Wells, Pam Lassiter Report Number 5 Center for Research on School Safety, School Climate and Classroom Management Georgia State University 2007
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Lessons from September 11 2 Abstract For many college counselors, professional careers can be broken into two periods: before and after September 11, 2001. In many cases, the period immediately after September 11 was a time of testing the crisis management plans and responses that had been developed over the years. It is critical that lessons learned from that response be clarified and used to further improve the entire field of crisis management. The present paper presents a specific crisis response plan developed at a Counseling Center at a large urban southeastern university that was tested to its limits following September 11. The crisis response plan was based upon Lagadec's (1993) Strategic Model. The debriefing of crisis response members and intense evaluation of the notes kept during the response have served as the data for evaluating the response, and constructing recommendations for improved future response plans. The crisis management response went through five identified stages: "Pre-crisis planning", "The Beginning", "Mobilization and Early Responses", "Later Responses", and "Review". While overall the Strategic Method worked as a viable framework for the response plan, numerous shortcomings were identified from communication loss among the response team, to confusion about how the response team was to link to inter-organizational members throughout the university.
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Lessons from September 11 3 "It should be. ..acknowledged that in this complex and unpredictable period of colleges and universities, a crisis may focus on an event that is at least initially perceived to be quite critical and could occur at any time. If administrators understand this, then they will be in the right frame of mind . .."(Darling, 1994, p. 49) For many counselors, especially those working with colleges and universities, professional careers will be broken into two periods: before and after Sept. 11, 2001. Despite the optimistic hopes of many, the beginning of the 21st century has brought a new "cold war", one neither so cold nor distant as before. In fact, the collective shock to the American psyche has been termed the "end of innocence" (Carver, 2001). Clinicians in all sectors of the profession were called upon to assist the nation to cope with the many facets of terror seemingly looming on the horizon. Many within the profession were tapped to respond not merely to individual clients, but to whole organizations grappling to protect personnel from an ambiguous and frightening threat. In many cases, the period immediately after September 11 was a time of testing prior crisis management plans developed over the years. Yet, few counselors seriously had planned for
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This note was uploaded on 04/05/2010 for the course POL 3232 taught by Professor What during the Spring '10 term at Accreditation Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine.

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4A575846d01 - Running head: CRISIS MANAGEMENT The end of...

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