FEEB763Fd01 - United States General Accounting Office GAO...

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a GAO United States General Accounting Office Testimony Before the Subcommittee on Government Efficiency, Financial Management and Intergovernmental Relations Committee on Government Reform House of Representatives For Release on Delivery 10:30 a.m. EST Friday February 15, 2002 MANAGING FOR RESULTS Next Steps to Improve the Federal Government’s Management and Performance Statement of J. Christopher Mihm Director, Strategic Issues GAO-02-439T
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Page 1 GAO-02-439T Mr. Chairman and Members of the Subcommittee: I am pleased to be here today to discuss the President’s Management Agenda to improve the management and performance of the federal government. The federal government is one of the largest, most complex, and diverse organizations in the world, facing a wide range of challenges in responding to a number of key trends, such as globalization, changing security threats, and demographic changes. Especially in light of the tragic events of September 11, federal agencies will need to work better with other governmental organizations, nongovernmental organizations, and the private sector, both domestically and internationally, to achieve results. Focusing on accountable, results-oriented management can help the federal government use this network to deliver economical, efficient, and effective programs and services to the American people. My central point today is that the administration’s plan to use the Executive Branch Management Scorecard to highlight agencies’ progress in achieving management and performance improvements embodied in the President’s Management Agenda is a promising first step. However, it is important to recognize that many of the challenges the federal government faces are long-standing and complex, and will require sustained attention. Therefore, as this subcommittee has emphasized by the topic of this hearing, the value of the scorecards is not in the scoring, but in the degree to which scores lead to sustained focus and demonstrable improvements. This will depend on continuing efforts to assess progress and maintain accountability to ensure that agencies are able to, in fact, improve their performance. As agreed with the subcommittee, my statement today will: discuss the administration’s scorecard approach to address five crosscutting management initiatives, describe the key elements that our work suggests are particularly important in implementing and sustaining management improvement initiatives so that they genuinely take root and eventually solve the problems they are intended to fix, and highlight the need for transparency and congressional oversight to provide the continuing attention needed to improve management and performance across the federal government.
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Page 2 GAO-02-439T The Administration’s Scorecard Provides a Starting Point for Improving Federal Management The objective of the Executive Branch Management Scorecard is to provide a tool that can be used to track progress in achieving the President’s
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FEEB763Fd01 - United States General Accounting Office GAO...

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