1st_intro - Constitutional Law II Introductionto1stAmendment

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Constitutional Law II Introduction to 1 st  Amendment
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Fall 2006 Con Law II 2 Prescribed Orthodoxy Galileo on trial - 1633
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Fall 2006 Con Law II 3 Free Speech & the  Enlightenment Maybe the church was right
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Fall 2006 Con Law II 4 Challenge to Orthodoxy Voted the most influential person of the 2d millennium
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Fall 2006 Con Law II 5 Reimposing Control John Twyn was  arrested in 1663  for printing a  book that  offended the  king. Twyn  refused to  reveal the name  of the book's  author, so he  was publicly  castrated and  disemboweled,  and his limbs  severed from  his body. Each  piece of his  body was nailed  to a London  gate or bridge.  Court of Star Chamber 1487-1641
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Fall 2006 Con Law II 6 Controlling Speech Printing Monopolies Stationers Company monopoly (1557) enforced by the Court of Star Chamber Licensing “Licensing laws” (mid-16 th  century) Milton (1644): “we do injuriously, by licensing  and prohibiting, to misdoubt [truth’s] strength” Blackstone (1765): Freedom of press  meant  only no prior restraint Treason/Sedition Laws of seditious libel criticism of the government prior  restraints post  restraints
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Fall 2006 Con Law II 7 Trial of John Peter Zenger   (1735) English law of seditious libel Punishing statements derogatory of the crown Zenger prosecuted for criticizing Gov. of NY Actually, just publisher, not author    see here Hamilton defends: truth is a defense Judge rejects; Jury acquits (“jury nullification”) 1 st  Amendment to the rescue Was its intent to  Prohibit licensing (prior restraint) or also Post-publication sanctions? Can it be expanded by its intent?  How?
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Fall 2006 Con Law II 8 Trial of Thomas Paine  (1792) Britain tried Paine for  seditious libel,  in abstentia
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Fall 2006 Con Law II 9 Alien and Sedition Acts   (1798) Prohibiting publication of “false, scandalous, and malicious writings . . against the government of the US with intent to defame, or stir up sedition or hatred” Truth was allowed as a defense (truth still not an absolute defense in British libel) Vigorous use to control political debate by Federalists against Republicans Jefferson pardoned all convicted apparently on federalism grounds, not free speech S.Ct. never ruled on constitutionality
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Fall 2006 Con Law II 10 Masses Pub. v. Patten   (1917) Tribute "Emma Goldman and Alexander Berkman Are in prison to-night, But they have made themselves elemental forces.
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This note was uploaded on 04/05/2010 for the course LAW LAW5502 taught by Professor Stern during the Spring '10 term at Florida State College.

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1st_intro - Constitutional Law II Introductionto1stAmendment

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