Charles Darwin paper

Charles Darwin paper - Darwinism Sarah Benton Fall 2008...

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Darwinism Sarah Benton 12/5/2008 Fall, 2008 Hybrid Concepts in Biology, Thursday Nights H. Mastrobuoni
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Sarah Benton Hybrid Concepts Bio Th. Night Fall 2008 Darwinism Paper Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution has been a constant sticking point in both education and religion since it’s conception in 1838. Darwin spent a good portion of his life dedicated to the study of evolution in animals, and eventually conceived his theories of natural selection and common descent in 1860. Darwin published his findings in several books, including On the Origin of Species and The Descent of Man (Ghiselin, 16). His findings created much controversy around the world, both at the end of the 19 th century and in more contemporary times. Darwin’s studies paved the way for thousands of evolutionary scientists, and, in turn, thousands of scientific and medical discoveries. Today, Darwin’s ideas are widely accepted as truth, although many religious groups forbid the teachings of evolution in favor of those of intelligent design. Darwin conducted several major studies throughout his scientific life. He was a skeptic when it came to religion, but attempted to appease his critics by adding phrases to his works that insinuated God had a hand in all proposed theories (Huxlley, 37). Darwin’s most famous study, which resulted in On the Origin of Species , and later in The Descent of Man, Darwin introduced the theory of “common descent”, which suggests that species with similar traits (both physically and genetically- phenotypes and genotypes) most likely descended from one original organism (IE, humans and primates). When this was proposed, the world was still caught in a religious grip, and to suggest that any species other than humans possessed a soul seemed ridiculous. Darwin slowly but surely published and sold his research pamphlets around Europe and the US, but to extreme skepticism. Like many artists and fellow scientists, Charles Darwin did not become a well-known scientific mind until after his death.
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Darwin’s studies on the Galapagos Islands led to most of his works. The naturalist spent a good deal of time touring the world on the H.M.S. Beagle, and studied the change in animals living on the Galapagos Islands in South America while on this excursion. He found there that the similarities between the fossils of extinct species and smaller species currently living on the islands. This was the basis for his theory on common descent. Darwin’s studies of finches while on the island were integral to his research. He hypothesized that the tiny finches living on the Galapagos Islands at the time were common descendents with the massive birds also living there. Darwin used skeletal remains and fossils he discovered to come up with these hypotheses. Darwin also studied
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Charles Darwin paper - Darwinism Sarah Benton Fall 2008...

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