3 a2 ZigBee

3 a2 ZigBee - Lecture 3 a-2(04/13 ZigBee Communications 1...

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Lecture 3 a-2 (04/13) ZigBee Communications 1. IEEE 802.15.4. Introduction 2. Physical and MAC layers 3. Data transfer 4. MAC Options 5. Upper layers 6. Home Networking with IEEE 802.15.4 7. Applications 8. The Network Layer 9. The Data Link Layer 10. The General MAC Frame Format 11. The Superframe Structure 12. The Physical Layer, Modulation 13. Canalization 14. The Packet Structure 15. Non-Beacon vs Beacon Modes 16. Noninvasive Biomedical Sensors 17. ZigBee and Bluetooth
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2 Applications low data rate wireless applications: sensor monitoring, building, and home automation, other applications requiring low power consumption ZigBee Wireless Control that Simply Works RESIDENTIAL/ LIGHT COMMERCIA L CONTROL CONSUMER ELECTRONICS TV VCR DVD/CD Remote control security lighting control access control lawn & garden irrigation PC & PERIPHERALS INDUSTRIAL CONTROL asset management process control environmental energy management PERSONAL HEALTH CARE BUILDING AUTOMATION security lighting control access control mouse keyboard joystick patient monitoring fitness monitoring
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3 Zigbee is a subset of the 802.15.4 specification. This standard is completed in May 2003, and defines the specifications of the PHY and MAC layers for ZigBee. The IEEE 802.15.4 specification is manly designed for command and control, for which a 200 Kbps data rate is more than enough. The ZigBee 1.0 specifications were defined in December 2004, and version 1.1 is now in the works. The distance about 70 meters.
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4 802.15.4 is a simple packet data protocol for wireless networks Channel Access Carrier Sense Multiple Access with collision avoidance (but, no RTS/CTS ) optional time slotting Message acknowledgement and an optional beacon structure Three bands , 27 channels specified 2.4 GHz: 16 channels, 250 kbps 902-928 MHz: 10 channels, 40 kbps 868.3 MHz : 1 channel, 20 kbps Long battery life , selectable latency for controllers, sensors, remote monitoring and portable electronics The modulation techniques according to the band: DSSS is used in all cases. However for the 868 and 915 MHz bands the actual form of modulation is BPSK . For the 2.4 GHz band, Offset O-QPSK is employed. 2. Physical and MAC layers
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5 3. Data transfer IEEE 802.15.4 MAC Overview Network size can reach 264 nodes (more than we’ll probably need) Using local addressing, simple networks of more than 65,000 nodes can be configured, with reduced address overhead Three devices specified Network Coordinator Full Function Device (FFD) Reduced Function Device (RFD) Simple frame structure Reliable delivery of data Association/disassociation CSMA/CA channel access Optional superframe structure with beacons
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6 Three device types Network Coordinator Maintains overall network knowledge; most sophisticated of the three types; most memory and computing power Full Function Device (FFD)
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3 a2 ZigBee - Lecture 3 a-2(04/13 ZigBee Communications 1...

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