Lecture%20outline,%20Systematics,%201Feb

Lecture outline%2 - a Monophyly b Analogy and homology c Phylogenetic trees i How many trees ii How to find the best one d Parsimony e Uses and

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Lecture outline, Biology 152, 1 February 2010 Systematics. In this lecture we will discuss how to organize species into classifications and then look at the field of phylogenetics, or how to reconstruct the evolutionary relationships among species. Both of these fields are important to conservation, evolutionary biology, epidemiology, and even forensics. General Topics: I. Systematics a. definition II. Taxonomy a. Hierarchical classification b. Binomial nomenclature c. Types of classifications III. Phylogeny reconstruction
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: a. Monophyly b. Analogy and homology c. Phylogenetic trees i. How many trees? ii. How to find the best one? d. Parsimony e. Uses and examples Something you should be aware of about your university …… The University of Kansas is one of the top institutions in the world for systematic biology. It has been instrumental in developing systematic theory over the past several decades and today remains at the forefront of systematic research, both in theoretic and empirical studies....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 04/06/2010 for the course BIOL 152 taught by Professor Niedenthal during the Spring '09 term at Kansas.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online