Chapter02.June02 - Chapter 2 An Introduction to Coordination Chemistry The sections and subsections in this chapter are listed below 2.1 The

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2 Chapter 2 An Introduction to Coordination Chemistry The sections and subsections in this chapter are listed below. 2.1 The Historical Perspective 2.2 The History of Coordination Compounds Early Compounds The Blomstrand-Jørgensen Chain Theory The Werner Coordination Theory 2.3 The Modern View of Coordination Compounds 2.4 An Introduction to the Nomenclature of Coordination Compounds Chapter 2 Objectives You should be able to define some important terms used in coordination chemistry give a few examples of coordination compounds encountered in earlier courses put coordination chemistry into the historical context of the conceptual development of atomic structure, the periodic table, and chemical bonding relate how the formulas and properties of early coordination compounds were but incompletely rationalized by the Blomstrand-Jørgensen chain theory explain how Werner's coordination theory, with its concept of primary and secondary valences, more completely rationalized the properties of early coordination compounds draw structural formulas for coordination compounds using both the Blomstrand- Jørgensen chain theory and the Werner coordination theory explain how Werner established that the secondary valence of cobalt(III) is directed to the corners of an octahedron work with a variety of coordination compounds involving monodentate, multidentate, bridging, and ambidentate ligands name coordination compounds involving a variety of metals, ligands, and counterions
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3 Cr OH 2 Cl Cl OH 2 H 2 O H 2 O Cl H 2 O Solutions to Odd-Numbered Problems 2.1. Dalton's atomic theory had three essential components. First, he proposed that all elements were composed of tiny, indivisible particles called atoms. All the atoms of a given element were the same in
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This note was uploaded on 04/06/2010 for the course CHEMISTRY CHM 3610 taught by Professor Dr.kavallieratos during the Spring '10 term at FIU.

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Chapter02.June02 - Chapter 2 An Introduction to Coordination Chemistry The sections and subsections in this chapter are listed below 2.1 The

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