Chapter03.June02 - Chapter 3 Structures of Coordination...

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Chapter 3 Structures of Coordination Compounds The sections and subsections of this chapter include 3.1 Stereoisomers 3.2 Octahedral Coordination Spheres Compounds with Monodentate Ligands Compounds with Chelating Ligands 3.3 Square Planar Coordination Spheres 3.4 Tetrahedral Coordination Spheres 3.5 Other Coordination Spheres 3.6 Structural Isomers Chapter 3 Objectives You should be able to distinguish among the various types of stereoisomers and structural isomers define, describe, test for, and be familiar with the nomenclature of chirality determine the number and types of and name stereoisomers commonly encountered in octahedral coordination compounds describe the general approach to resolving isomers of ionic coordination compounds demonstrate how Werner forever laid to rest the idea that chirality was a property associated only with carbon determine the number and types of and name stereoisomers commonly encountered in square planar and tetrahedral coordination compounds appreciate and give examples of coordination compounds with coordination numbers other than four or six define and give an example of fluxional five-coordinate compounds recognize and predict the incidence of coordination and ionization structural isomers describe, name, and predict the incidence of linkage isomers that occur with the common ambidentate ligands 8
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Solutions to Odd-Numbered Problems 3.1. Ethanol and dimethylether are isomers because they have the same number and types of atoms but different properties. Furthermore, they are structural isomers because they have different numbers and types of chemical bonds. For example, ethanol has one C-O bond while dimethylether has two. 3.3. The two chain theory formulations would be considered to be stereoisomers because they have the same numbers and types of chemical bonds (three each of Co-N, NH 3 -NH 3 , and NH 3 -Cl) but differ in the spatial arrangements of those bonds. 3.5. A light beam of a given wavelength can be polarized such that only one plane of the electric or magnetic field is allowed. A molecule is optically active if it is capable of rotating that plane to the right or to the left when the light beam is passed through the substance. *3.7. For each case (MA 4 B 2 and MA 3 B 3 ), these are geometric isomers because they have the same numbers and types of chemical bonds but the different spatial arrangements of these bonds result in different geometries. In the MA 4 B 2 set the 1,6 case does not contain an internal mirror plane and is chiral. The 1,5 isomer is actually the nonsuperimposable mirror image of the 1,6 isomer. Similarly, in the MA
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This note was uploaded on 04/06/2010 for the course CHEMISTRY CHM 3610 taught by Professor Dr.kavallieratos during the Spring '10 term at FIU.

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Chapter03.June02 - Chapter 3 Structures of Coordination...

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