Chapter10.June02 - Chapter 10 Hydrogen and Hydrides The...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
63 Chapter 10 Hydrogen and Hydrides The sections and subsections of this chapter are listed below. 10.1 The Origin of the Elements (and of Us!) 10.2 The Discovery, Preparation, and Uses of Hydrogen 10.3 Isotopes of Hydrogen 10.4 Radioactive Processes involving Hydrogen Alpha and Beta Decay, Nuclear Fission, and Deuterium Tritium 10.5 Hydrides and the Network Covalent Hydrides Ionic Hydrides Metallic Hydrides 10.6 The Role of Hydrogen in Various Alternative Energy Sources Hydrogen Economy Nuclear Fusion
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
64 Chapter 10 Objectives You should be able to explain the nature of the "big bang" theory give a brief general account of the origin of the elements represent the nucleus of an element properly explain the source of energy in nuclear reactions explain the difference between fusion and fission relate how and by whom hydrogen was discovered explain how hydrogen gas is commonly generated in the laboratory describe the common industrial preparations and uses of hydrogen describe the dangers and uses of the reaction between hydrogen and oxygen describe the similarities and differences among the three isotopes of hydrogen describe the isolation and uses of "heavy water," D 2 O describe, represent and explain the deuteration of various compounds describe and give examples of α, ß - , and ß + decay explain the concept of half life as it applies to radioactive isotopes explain and represent fission describe the conditions for the occurrence of a nuclear fission chain reaction relate the first example of nuclear transmutation describe how tritium is produced in nature and by humankind discuss the placement of hydrogen among the groups of the representative elements describe the three major oxidation states of hydrogen describe and give examples of covalent hydrides describe and give examples of ionic or "saline" hydrides and their uses describe and give examples of metallic hydrides and their uses discuss the nature of nonstoichiometric interstitial hydrides describe what is meant by the "hydrogen economy" describe the potential of nuclear fusion as a future energy source
Background image of page 2
65 Solutions to Odd-Numbered Problems 10.1. “Ylem” is the word Aristotle used to describe the substance out of which all the universe was created. Today we tend to use a word such as “singularity” to describe the nature of the universe before the big bang or what is referred to in the text as the “expansion of ylem”. The big bang is the accepted scientific theory for how the universe came into being. For reasons not known, the ylem or singularity, at a definite point in time, exploded to create the very fabric of space and, eventually, the universe as we know it. The first elements to appear were hydrogen and helium. Gradually, as these swirling clouds began to cool and coalesce together due to gravitational forces, the hydrogen started to sequentially fuse to produce elements as heavy as iron. So the first stars started to “burn” hydrogen and lighted up the
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 7

Chapter10.June02 - Chapter 10 Hydrogen and Hydrides The...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online