Chapter11.June02 - Chapter 11 Oxygen, Aqueous Solutions,...

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70 Chapter 11 Oxygen, Aqueous Solutions, and the Acid Base Character of Oxides and Hydroxides The sections and subsections of this chapter are listed below. 11.1 Oxygen Discovery Occurrence, Preparation, Properties, and Uses 11.2 Water and Aqueous Solutions The Structure of the Water Molecule Ice and Liquid Water Solubility of Substances in Water The Self-Ionization of Water 11.3 The Acid-Base Character of Oxides and Hydroxides in Aqueous Solution Oxides: Survey and Periodic Trends in Oxides in Aqueous Solution (Acidic and Basic Anhydrides) The E-O-H Unit in Aqueous Solution An Addition to the Network 11.4 The Relative Strengths of Oxo- and Hydroacids in Aqueous Solution Oxoacids Nomenclature of Oxoacids and corresponding salts (Optional) Hydroacids 11.5 Ozone 11.6 The Greenhouse Effect and Global Warming
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71 Chapter 11 Objectives You should be able to relate how and by whom oxygen was discovered explain why Priestley was able to isolate many more gases than scientists before him describe the influence of the phlogiston theory of combustion on the discovery of oxygen explain why Priestley could be called the "father of the modern soft drink industry" explain the general relationship between carbon dioxide and oxygen in the biosphere explain and represent how oxygen gas is generally prepared industrially and in the laboratory describe some of the most important uses of oxygen describe the structure and polarity of an individual water molecule describe the utility of the FONCl rule of hydrogen bonding relate the nature and properties of ice and snowflakes to the structure of solid water describe and represent the "flickering cluster" model of water structure describe, explain, and represent the solubility of ionic and covalent substances in liquid water describe and represent the self-ionization of water describe the utility and limitations of the concept of the hydronium ion in water and as a product of acids in aqueous solution show and explain the distribution of ionic, covalent polymeric, and discrete molecular oxides in the periodic table explain why metal oxides are basic anhydrides explain why nonmetal oxides are acidic anhydrides describe and give an example of an amphoteric anhydride and oxide explain why substances containing an M-O-H unit are basic in aqueous solution: give several examples explain why substances containing an NM-O-H unit are acidic in aqueous solution; give several examples explain the effect on the strength of an oxoacid of changing the central atom; give several examples explain the effect on the strength of an oxoacid of changing the number of nonhydroxyl oxygens attached to the central atom; give several examples name a variety of oxoacids and their salts explain the variation of acid strength in hydroacids within a period and a group of the periodic table; give several examples describe and represent ozone describe how ozone is formed and some of its beneficial uses
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This note was uploaded on 04/06/2010 for the course CHEMISTRY CHM 3610 taught by Professor Dr.kavallieratos during the Spring '10 term at FIU.

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Chapter11.June02 - Chapter 11 Oxygen, Aqueous Solutions,...

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