WST 355- Working Women and the Vote

WST 355 Working - Sikiru Adesina WST 355 Prof Nutter Pre Suffrage Textile Working Women and the Vote Why the two needed to co-exist My paper will

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Sikiru Adesina WST 355 2/5/09 Prof. Nutter Pre- Suffrage Textile Working Women and the Vote: Why the two needed to co-exist My paper will examine the ties between the working woman of the 20 th century and the fight for suffrage. It will describe the emergence of women in the work place and explain how the push for suffrage and its ultimate realization was fueled by the vigor of working women who demanded liberation. In American history, women and the right to vote have had a long and tumultuous relationship that eventually ended in a marriage in 1920. Women could finally vote and have a voice in their government but what was life like for the average textile worker before this liberty was granted? This paper will review the conditions that textile workers were forced to endure before regulations were set in place and enforced to protect the well being of workers. This paper will also examine why the right to vote was imperative for the realization of making a positive change for working women. In addition the paper will briefly explore the origin of the fight for the vote. The audience will understand how working women became a part of the struggle and what oppositions they faced. Finally this paper will explain the benefits that were realized after the right to vote was granted to women as it applies to the textile industry. Various texts and my understanding of this course will serve as sources to substantiate any claim that this paper will make. The reader will come away with a well rounded understanding of why working women needed the right to vote. Before we explore why the right to vote was important for working women, I feel that it is imperative that the audience recognizes the daily and excruciating circumstances that were attached to being a female worker before August 26, 1920 when women were permitted suffrage. In the late 1800’s and early 1900’s workers complained about various occupational hazards that were synonymous with their occupational environment and with good reason. To the average modern day American, conditions in the early 1900’s are more likely to sound similar if not worse than time with hard labor in a third world prison. Industrial women were trapped by a necessity of making a living in a male dominated society which sought profit over humanity. The right to vote and be truly represented was a frontier that had to be abridged for true progress to established, especially in a case such as this where human liberties were trampled upon for industrial gain. Women in the textile industry toiled for endless hours of the day under the most merciless conditions making shirt waists. Safety was thrown out of the window as workers were usually locked and confined into their workspace until the end of what tended to be more than a ten hour work day. This circumstance might not be as dreadful if those women were allowed certain simple freedoms and respect like going into the bathroom and being treated like valuable employees. Alas they experienced the
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This note was uploaded on 04/06/2010 for the course WST 301 taught by Professor Kandi during the Spring '10 term at Suffolk.

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WST 355 Working - Sikiru Adesina WST 355 Prof Nutter Pre Suffrage Textile Working Women and the Vote Why the two needed to co-exist My paper will

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