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Sikiru Adesin1 - Sikiru Adesina 106223646 Dissolving...

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Sikiru Adesina 106223646 Dissolving Happiness to its bare essentials How do you know when somebody is happy? Smiles, laughter, humor and just the warmth that one emits can be a good sign. But the more serious question is what makes one happy. Is happiness simply held within the boundaries that storm Jameson has held it with when he says, “Happiness comes from the capacity to feel deeply, to enjoy simply, to think freely, to risk life, to be needed?” Dictionary.com describes happiness as “good fortune; pleasure; contentment; joy.” Not until now have I ever been confused as what happiness truly means. I fear that this essay will not be in depth enough to truly uncover the gravity of such a simple and commonly used word. In my view point, happiness is simply when you are not sad. You can be feeling other emotions but as long as sadness or melancholy isn’t one of them then you are happy and thus experiencing happiness. Such a mundane description it seems at first I know, but my essay will go on to explain why in this age of commercialism, my description is top choice over Storm Jameson’s description and Dictionary.com. This will be done by analyzing the Time article by James Poniewozik, “The art of Unhappiness.” The easiest definition to dispense after reading the Time article is storm Jameson’s. He claims that “happiness comes from the capacity to feel deeply, to enjoy simply, to think freely, to risk life, to be needed.” I could not agree any less. James Poniewozik makes a point, which I support, that art has grown more depressing as commercialism has grown, especially in America. Advertisers make it a point to sell their
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products through mass media that depicts happiness. This is very true; I am yet to witness
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