Experiment 11- Spherical Mirrors & Lenses (A & B)

Experiment 11- Spherical Mirrors & Lenses (A & B) -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Christian Lawrence Neha Manikonda Pritesh Patel Yasmine Hill 3/31/10 Instructor: Sonal Singh
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Abstract Reflection is described by the law of reflection as the angle of incidence is equal to the angle of reflection. During the investigation of reflection and refraction we were able to change the angles the light reflected and measure the angle from which the incidence occurred. But during the current investigation using spherical mirrors and lenses we were able to see that not every surface obeys the law of reflection. For convex surfaces the image is produced outside of the spherical section and the image cannot be seen. Compared to a concave surface, the image is produced on the inside of the spherical section and at a certain distance that the image can be seen clearly. Introduction When light is reflected against the surface of a mirror or lens, it creates three distinct types of rays. These rays are the chief ray, parallel ray, and focal ray. The chief ray goes through the center of curvature or an object and is also reflected back from that object in the same direction. The parallel ray runs from the object to the optic axis on a parallel bath and then reflects through the focal point. Then the focal ray does the opposite of the parallel ray by passing through the focal point from the object and reflecting it parallel to the optic axis. These rays helps determine whether the image will be virtual, real, inverted, upright, smaller, bigger,
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 7

Experiment 11- Spherical Mirrors & Lenses (A & B) -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online