Experiment_3_ohms_law - circuit from the lab manual needs...

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e circuit from the lab manual needs to be drawn in (in this spot) by hand once the lab report is printed. Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 2 University of Alabama at Birmingham PH202-Lab Experiment #3, Ohm’s Law Delta 6 Tandy McAlister ___________________________________________ Constance Doss ___________________________________________ Margaret Ashley McKinley __________________________________ Kellsea-Paige Broxton _______________________________________ TA: Hicham Ghossein September 17, 2009
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Abstract During the Ohm’s Law experiment, our objective was to understand the relationship between voltages and currents. Throughout this investigation we were able to study the behavior in both ohmic and nonohmic resistances. (PLE.) By setting up a circuit we were able to adjust voltages, currents, and resistances for three different investigations. We were also able to take an unknown, calculate that it had a resistance of 4700 ohms, and vary the voltage and current on it to verify the resistance. While varying the current with voltage for the first part of the experiment, we changed the resistivity to 1200 ohms and 1400 ohms to see different deviations. For the last part we kept the voltage constant in order to record the deviations of the current and resistance. For these investigations, we found a percent error of 2.26%, 1.8%, 1.61%, respectively for each inquiry.
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Introduction Ohm’s Law allowed us to set up three different tables in order to collect data and review the effects of changing one variable. An Ohm is defined in units of voltage/ampere and is the resistance of that materials ratio for applied voltage and resulting current. The symbol for an Ohm is Ω. (PLE.) In order to be ohmic, the material must follow ohm’s law. We were able to prove that conducting materials for our circuit were ohmic by making the three variations. We also measured the voltage in volts (V) and the current (I) in milliamperes. First we a constant resistivity and varied the voltage coming from our power supply. Then we were able to record the volt meter’s readings as well as the current. We ran this experiment twice, first with the resistivity at a constant of 1200Ω and 1400Ω. This allowed us to compare the theoretical voltage with the actual voltage the volt meter read. Second we obtained an unknown from out TA. Using table A5, Color Code for Resistors (Composition Type), we were able to define our resistors at 4700Ω. As this was kept constant, we again were able to adjust the electricity coming from our power supply and record the data from the volt meter and the amp meter. Lastly we kept the voltage constant so we could see the varying resistance and current for the
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This note was uploaded on 04/06/2010 for the course PH 202 LAB LAB taught by Professor Lawson during the Spring '10 term at University of Alabama - Huntsville.

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Experiment_3_ohms_law - circuit from the lab manual needs...

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