lec3_semiconductors0

lec3_semiconductors0 - Lecture 3: Transistor Semiconductor...

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Lecture 3: Transistor Semiconductor Physics -Atoms in insulators as well as conductors have a conduction band and valence band. All atoms have these bands; in insulators the bands are prohibitively separated from each other making it difficult for thermal energy or other excited particles to energize electrons to jump from one band to the other. This effectively produces a potential energy well for the electrons, a trap if you will. In order to gain the necessary energy to cross this gap, transistors employ the quantum mechanical process known as tunneling to allow some, but not all, of the electrons to gain just enough energy to cross an energy gap in order to conduct, hence the name semi-conductor. In such transistor applications, four main sources exist to give electrons the required energy to jump this barrier: heat, radiative, electrical, and magnetic energy. Question: As a computer engineer, which source is most commonly used, most problematic (why?), most efficiently used, and most flexible to use?
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2010 for the course ELEC ecse 421 taught by Professor Guss during the Winter '10 term at McGill.

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lec3_semiconductors0 - Lecture 3: Transistor Semiconductor...

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