Lecture21A - Lecture 21 1 Liquid-liquid Solutions Ideal and...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture 21 1 Liquid-liquid Solutions Ideal and Miscible (Chpt 24.1-4) We will extend our knowledge of phase equilibria to multi-component systems. We must first consider partial molar quantities (initially for two components). ( 29 1 2 , , , , , so partial molar Gibbs Energy i j j j j T P n G T P n n G G n = = The chemical potential of one component in a multi-component system is its partial molar Gibbs energy. We can, in principle, define partial molar quantities for other thermodynamic quantities: , , , , . i k i j j k j k T P n T P n S V S V etc n n = = Lecture 21 2 Now at constant T, P (typical experimental conditions): 1 1 2 2 dG dn dn = + Note:G and n j are extensive thermodynamic variables. If we are adding components to our system, or adjusting the size of our system: 1 1 2 2 , dn n d dn n d dG Gd = = = 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 2 2 at constant T and P Gd n d n d G n n = + = + We can do the same with another extensive variable: 1 1 2 2 V V n V n = + Fig 24.1 i Note: V can vary with mole fraction Lecture 21 3 From our definitions: G H TS =- j i i taking at constant T,P,n n i i i H TS =- Similarly: dG=-SdT+VdP j i i taking at constant T,P,n n...
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Lecture21A - Lecture 21 1 Liquid-liquid Solutions Ideal and...

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