Lecture13A - Lecture 13 1 Welcome to Entropy (20.1-3) 1 st...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture 13 1 Welcome to Entropy (20.1-3) 1 st Law tells us whether energy or enthalpy is released or absorbed in a chemical process. It does not tell us whether a process will occur spontaneously. Well, what does make a process spontaneous? 1 st thought: energy (or enthalpy) based, i.e. exothermic process would seem reasonable. Products have lower energy (enthalpy) than reactants. 2 nd thought: what would we expect based on mechanical systems? Balls run downhill, springs unwind, effects of gravity. All tend to minimize energy. 1) Consider expansion of a gas against P ext =0 in an isolated system. P ext =0 so w=0. Isolated so q=0. Therefore: U=0=H. Yet the gas will spontaneously expand (and the opposite doesnt happen i.e. gas will not spontaneously occupy less than the full V of the system!) Lecture 13 2 2) Mixing two gases; again U=0=H but gases will mix. Opposite process does not occur spontaneously (N 2 and O 2 dont spontaneously separate!) 3) Phase changes: solid liquid (at T>T m ), liquid gas (at T>T b )....
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This note was uploaded on 04/08/2010 for the course CHEM 444 taught by Professor Jameslis during the Spring '08 term at University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.

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Lecture13A - Lecture 13 1 Welcome to Entropy (20.1-3) 1 st...

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