Chapter 13-review questions

Chapter 13-review questions - Systems Analysis and Design...

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Systems Analysis and Design in a Changing World, Fourth Edition 12-1 Chapter 13 – Designing Databases Solutions to End-of-Chapter Material Review Questions 1. List the components of a DBMS, and describe the function of each. Application program interface – An interface engine or library of precompiled subroutines that enable application programs (such as those written in C or Java) to interact with the database. End-user query processor – A program or utility that allows end users to retrieve data and generate reports without writing application programs. Data definition interface – A program or utility that allows a database administrator to define or modify the content and structure of the database (for example, add new fields or redefine data types or relationships). Data access and control logic – The system software that controls access to the physical database and maintains various internal data structures (for example, indices and pointers). Database – The physical data store (or stores) combined with the schema. Schema – A store of data that describes various aspects of the “real” data, including data types, relationships, indices, content restrictions, and access controls. Physical data store – The “real” data as stored on a physical storage medium (for example, a magnetic disk). 2. What is a database schema? What information does it contain? A database schema is a store of data that describes the content and structure of the physical data store (sometimes called metadata—data about data). It contains a variety of information about data types, relationships, indices, content restrictions, and access controls. 3. Why have databases become the preferred method of storing data used by an information system? Databases are a common point of access, management, and control. They allow data to be managed as an enterprise-wide resource while providing simultaneous access to many different users and application programs. They solve many of the problems associated
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Systems Analysis and Design in a Changing World, Fourth Edition 12-2 with separately maintained data stores, including redundancy, inconsistent security, and inconsistent data access methods. 4. List four different types of database models and DBMSs. Which are in common use today? The four database models are hierarchical, network (CODASYL), relational, and object- oriented. Hierarchical and network models are technologies of the 1960s and 1970s and are rarely found today. The relational model was developed in the 1970s and widely deployed in the 1980s and 1990s. It is currently the predominant database model. The object-oriented database model was first developed in the 1990s and is still being developed today. It is expected to slowly replace the relational model over the next decade. 5.
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This note was uploaded on 04/08/2010 for the course ICT ICT2621 taught by Professor Na during the Summer '10 term at University of South Africa.

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Chapter 13-review questions - Systems Analysis and Design...

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