Data Visualisation and Data Mining Technology for Supporting Care for Older People

Data Visualisation and Data Mining Technology for Supporting Care for Older People

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Data Visualisation and Data Mining Technology for Supporting Care for Older People Nubia M. Gil *, Nicolas A. Hine *, John L. Arnott *, Julienne Hanson # , Richard G. Curry @ , Telmo Amaral * & Dorota Osipovi č # * School of Computing, Dundee University, Dundee DD1 4HN, UK. {nubiagil, nhine, jarnott, tamaral} @computing.dundee.ac.uk # Bartlett School of Graduate Studies, University College London, Gower St., London WC1E 6BT, UK. {j.hanson, d.osipovic}@ucl.ac.uk @ Tanaka Business School, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ, UK. richard.curry@imperial.ac.uk ABSTRACT The overall purpose of the research discussed here is the enhancement of home-based care by revealing individual patterns in the life of a person, through modelling of the “busyness” of activity in their dwelling, so that care can be better tailored to their needs and changing circumstances. The use of data mining and on-line analytical processing (OLAP) is potentially interesting in this context because of the possibility of exploring, detecting and predicting changes in the level of activity of people’s movement that may reflect change in well-being. An investigation is presented here into the use of data mining and visualisation to illustrate activity from sensor data from a trial project run in a domestic context. Categories and Subject Descriptors H.3.3 [ Information Search and Retrieval ]: Information Search and Retrieval – Information filtering, search process, selection; K.4.2 [ Computers and Society] : Social Issues – Assistive technologies for persons with disabilities . General Terms Measurement, Experimentation, Human Factors. Keywords Older adults, independent living, assistive technology, visualisa- tion, data mining. 1. INTRODUCTION The number of older people in our society has experienced a dramatic rise, because the expected lifespan is longer than in previous decades. Therefore, many European, American and Far Eastern countries are starting to face a crisis because existing resources are inadequate to support essential health and social services for older people. In 2005 it was estimated that there were about 12 million people in the UK over 60 years of age, of whom 752,000 were aged between 85 and 89, and 376,000 exceeded 90 years of age. According to Age Concern Scotland (2005), for example, there were over 1,097,026 people aged 60 or more in Scotland, representing approximately 21.5% of the total population [1]. In the UK, Age Concern estimated that there were approximately four people of working age (20-64 years) to each person over the age of 65 years by 2004. In comparison, in 40 years’ time the proportion will be 2:1 [2]. In Scotland, the Scottish Executive reported that the total population aged 16-64 years is projected to decrease by 5% by 2019. As a comparison, the population aged over 65 is projected to increase by 26% by 2019 [3].
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Data Visualisation and Data Mining Technology for Supporting Care for Older People

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