Cornell Notes chapter 4 and 5 .docx - Name Sarah Hanna Date 2 October 2019 Cornell Notes Chapter 4 and 5 Page Numbers Reduce then Recite Create

Cornell Notes chapter 4 and 5 .docx - Name Sarah Hanna Date...

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Name: Sarah Hanna Date: 2, October 2019 Cornell Notes Chapter 4 and 5 Page Numbers Reduce & then Recite - Create questions which elicit critical thinking, not 1 word answers - Write questions directly across from the answers in your notes - Leave a space or draw a pencil line separating questions You may also want to use this area record the headings of each of the Record for Review - Write headings and key words in (you may want to use a different font color) - Take sufficient notes with selective (not too much verbiage) & accurate paraphrasing - Skip a line between ideas and topics - Use bulleted lists and abbreviations - Correctly sequence information Include diagrams or tables if needed for clarification or length What are the threats to the household? What is the role of women? Tenancy What were the regional differences? Chapter 4 Expansion v. Anglicization Threats to Householder Autonomy After 1700, assemblies grew slower than population Above local level – mostly gentlemen Voters remained independent By 1760 – tidewater VA – 80% of land entailed – younger sons looked west PA’s Chester Co. – married farm laborers – no title/lease – cottage on sm. Patch 25% of county population After 1750s – higher rents, shorter leases in NY Revert to inheritance similar to Europe Anglicizing the Role of Women Women came w/dowry – coverture: husbands made all legally binding decisions Dower rights – 1/3 of estate if husband dies Women in NE take over weaving; after 1700 lose most inheritance rights English law prevailed – after 1700, courts rarely convicted men of sex crimes The rental of property. To attract tenants in New York's Hudson River Valley, Dutch and English manorial lords granted long tenancy leases, with the right to sell improvements to the next tenant Expansion, Immigration, and Regional Differentiation Emergence of the Old South 1730 – 630,000 settlers/slaves; 1775 – additional 248,000 slaves, 284,000 Euro Most settle in Middle, Southern Colonies 90% of slaves to Southern colonies – slaves in NE (15k), NY (19k) 80% of slaves came on British slave ships – few from West Indies Creation of Old South – wealthy slaveholding planters After 1730, burgess most likely a slaveholder Upper South (VA, MD) differed from lower South (NC, SC, GA) Upper South – some skilled artisans – family life Christianization of slaves – more dutiful SC – malaria – house to higher ground – no Christianization Sickle cell protects against malaria – anemia an issue Task system – more free time - lower reproduction – better than gang labor Gullah – pidgin – By Revolution, SC had self-sustaining slave
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What are the Mid-Atlantic colonies? Competency Who was Zabdiel Boylston? Household Mode of Production What was the world of Print and why was it significant?
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