Cornell Notes Chapter 21 copy.docx - Cornell Notes Chapter 21 Page Numbers Reduce then Recite Create questions which elicit critical thinking not 1word

Cornell Notes Chapter 21 copy.docx - Cornell Notes Chapter...

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Cornell Notes Chapter 21 Page Numbers Reduce & then Recite - Create questions which elicit critical thinking, not 1word answers - Write questions directly across from answers in your notes - Leave space or draw pencil line separating questions You may also want to use this area record headings of each of Record for Review - Write headings , key words in (you may want to use different font color) - Take sufficient notes with selective (not too much verbiage) & accurate paraphrasing - Skip line between ideas , topics - Use bulleting lists , abbreviations - Correctly sequence information Include diagrams or tables if needing for clarification or length What were the foundations of the new empire that was being created? Why is this period of time referred toas a new imperialism? Why were the American Indians denied citizenship? What was president Cleveland continuing work on? American Exceptionalism I. From Expansion to Imperialism A. Foundations of Empire 1.Historians describe twentieth-century U.S. imperialism is new. Now they emphasize continuities between foreign policy in this era, nation’s earlier, relentless expansion across continent. 4.Intellectual trends also favoring imperialism. As early as 1885, Congregationalist minister Josiah Strong urging Protestants to proselytize overseas. He is predicting that American “Anglo- Saxon race” would “spread itself over earth.” Such arguments were grounding in American exceptionalism, idea that U.S. had unique destiny to foster democracy, civilization. 5.Imperialists, basing their argument on precedent of denying citizenship to American Indians, Asian immigrants as well as vote to southern blacks, also using popular racial theories to justify rule over foreign people of color. 6.As American policymakers saw European powers busily carving up Africa, Asia among themselves, embarking on arms race to build steel-plating battleships, fear of ruthless competition drove U.S. to also invest in latest weapons. Book Influence of Sea Power upon History (1890), U.S.naval officer Alfring T. Mahan urging U.S. to enter fray, observing that naval power had been essential to growth of past empires. In 1890, Congress appropriating funds for 3battleships.
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