CPR - Buffers

CPR - Buffers - Exercise (stress) placed on a system...

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Exercise (stress) placed on a system changes pH of our blood, but bodily buffer systems respond to reverse this change. <br><br> Homeostasis keeps the chemical composition of a system (internal and external) constant with the use of buffers. <br> <br> The production of H<sup>+</sup> increases pH. Acidosis occurs when the blood pH falls below 7.4. Kidneys remove the excess H<sup>+</sup>; metabolic acidosis results from the inability for kidneys to excrete H<sup>+</sup>. Lungs stabilize the pH by removing carbon dioxide. Respiratory acidosis results when lungs fail to remove carbon dioxide faster than it is produced. <br> <br> An acid-base buffer constitutes a weak acid and its conjugate base. When protons are added, the base protonates and converts to an acid; when hydroxide ions are added, the acid deprotonates and converts to a base. When stress is placed on a system at equilibrium, equilibrium will shift to reduce that stress. In a carbonic-acid/bicarbonate buffer, when protons are added,
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CPR - Buffers - Exercise (stress) placed on a system...

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