Morality - Bryan Gastelle Tuske Morality Reflection Paper...

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Bryan Gastelle Tuske Morality Reflection Paper People have always believed in a sense of right and wrong in the world. The nature of morality varies from person to person; however as humans we have a lot in common. Philosophers have divided theories of morality into two broad concepts. Objectivism is the first; this is the concrete approach to morality. Objectivism states that all morals are firm and do not change regardless of circumstance. Subjectivism is the opposite; subjectivism dictates that morality is contingent upon the belief of one individual or culture to the next; and whether or not there are consequences to your actions. Objectivism is arguably the simplest moral philosophy; however it is also the most flawed. The major problem with objectivism is that not every decision made can be classified by a system of rules; many of our decisions are not simple and in fact very complicated. For example, the question has been posed throughout recent history as to whether or not America should have dropped the nuclear bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. If we did not do it than WWII certainly would have gone on for a much longer time and therefore more American and Japanese soldiers would lose their lives. The numbers have been run and the casualties of WWII,
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Morality - Bryan Gastelle Tuske Morality Reflection Paper...

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