BecerraIM_ch10 - Instructor's Manual Knowledge Elicitation...

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Instructor's Manual Knowledge Elicitation – Converting Tacit Knowledge to Explicit Knowledge 10-1 Chapter 10 Knowledge Elicitation – Converting Tacit Knowledge to Explicit Knowledge Teaching Objectives Introduce the student to capturing tacit knowledge from human sources and convert it into explicit knowledge Introduce the student to the various stages of the traditional one-on-one interview and how they can be managed for effectiveness Other elicitation techniques such as observation, role-reversal, etc. The variations of the one-on-one interview when more than one person participates Key Terms The following alphabetical list identifies the key terms discussed in this chapter. The page number for each key term is provided. Close-ended questions, p. 183 Constrained processing tasks, p. 187 General knowledge-gathering interview sessions, p. 182 Interviews, p. 181 Kick-off interview, p. 181 Knowledge elicitation, p. 180 Knowledge capture, p. 180 Limited information tasks, p. 187 Many-on-one interview, p. 189 Many-on-many interview, p. 189 Model-based reasoning, p. 194 Observational elicitation, p. 194 One-line diagram, p. 195 One-on-many interview, p. 188 One-on-one interview, p. 181 Open-ended questions, p. 182 Output-input-middle method, p. 183 Repertory grids, p. 190 Role reversal, p. 184 Specific problem-solving, knowledge-gathering interview sessions, p. 182 Teaching Suggestions For undergraduate students, it is most important that they learn to do knowledge elicitation using the various manual techniques described in the chapter. In addition to understanding the mechanics of knowledge elicitation, the graduate student should come away understanding the difference between human knowledge – already known by someone, and that not known by humans. This is an important difference between the contents of this chapter and Chapter 12 – Data Mining. The graduate student should also
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Instructor's Manual Knowledge Elicitation – Converting Tacit Knowledge to Explicit Knowledge 10-2 understand the concepts behind the automated knowledge acquisition methods described in this chapter. Review Questions 1. Describe in our own words the concept of a repertory grid. What concepts from clinical psychology inspired this idea? The concepts of repertory grids came from the theory of personal constructs by George Kelly. This psychological tool allowed a patient to build a model of the world as perceived by her. This allowed the therapist to address various aspects of the patient’s psyche. Repertory grids are tables that relate several attributes of the problem. Each attribute is defined as a spectrum of opposite extremes. The patient then places a value indicating the distance to each extreme that corresponds to her perception of this attribute’s value. Repertory grids can serve to represent knowledge and assist in the elicitation process.
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BecerraIM_ch10 - Instructor's Manual Knowledge Elicitation...

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