ENGL 42 - David Zakutansky English 42 Professor Ratcliffe Summer 2009 Position Paper#1 From Hopeful to Doubtful(this needs work In Stephen Crane's

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David Zakutansky English 42 Professor Ratcliffe Summer 2009 Position Paper #1 From Hopeful to Doubtful (this needs work) In Stephen Crane’s, The Open Boat , characters surround themselves with a huge sense of false hope. From beginning to end, the Oiler, Correspondent, Cook, and Captain all turn from hugely optimistic to gravely pessimistic in a matter of a few short pages. Why does Crane fill the men with such false hopes and optimism? It seems to be the naturalistic side of Crane taking the reins here in which he uses descriptive images of the scene to predict fate. For example, when one of the men says, “Look! There’s a man on shore…So He is! By thunder!. ..we’re all right!” there is a sense of cheerfulness and confidence in the air of the small dingy the men are surviving on in the ocean (p235). In addition, on page 234 the men express their anger with a long tirade cursing the ocean, the “seven mad gods that rule the sea”, and “old ninny-woman, Fate” (p234). Although there is cursing and anger there is still hope in the air because not only
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This note was uploaded on 04/08/2010 for the course ENGL 4000 taught by Professor Smith during the Spring '10 term at Saginaw Valley.

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ENGL 42 - David Zakutansky English 42 Professor Ratcliffe Summer 2009 Position Paper#1 From Hopeful to Doubtful(this needs work In Stephen Crane's

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