Revised I.C.E. - Revised Canterbury Tales I.C.E. Since no...

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Unformatted text preview: Revised Canterbury Tales I.C.E. Since no one from this generation has ever experienced the middle ages first hand, the easiest way for a reader to get an idea of what life was like is through literature. Despite all the positive and popular aspects of the middle ages, in Geoffrey Chaucers The Canterbury Tales irony is used through the prioress, the pardoner, and the wife of bath to express the authors true negative feelings about society. The prioress is one of the most obvious examples of irony within the tales. Being a nun, the prioress has many virtues and morals. However, several of these morals do not correspond to what a nun might believe. For example, the prioress dresses in riches and tries to stand out. A typical nun would never be seen doing such a thing. Also, the prioress has much love for animals, including her dog. However, owning a dog was banned by the church for anyone with a high status. Both of these are great examples that show Chaucers disgust for corruption among high status....
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This note was uploaded on 04/08/2010 for the course PHYS 125 taught by Professor Kawar during the Spring '10 term at American Public University.

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Revised I.C.E. - Revised Canterbury Tales I.C.E. Since no...

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