Lecture 13 - CNS Anatomy and Function Bio416K Spring 2010

Lecture 13 - CNS Anatomy and Function Bio416K Spring 2010 -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–18. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Sensory Pathways to Somatosensory Cortex (Textbook chapters 9 and 10)
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Primary Motor and Primary Sensory Areas of the Cerebral Cortex Primary motor cortex Somatosensory cortex
Background image of page 2
Dermatomes – area of skin innervated by a single spinal nerve
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Sensory Receptors – simple or complex (Figure 10-1, P. 335)
Background image of page 4
Pacinian Corpuscle
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Structure of a Peripheral Nerve
Background image of page 6
Spinal Cord – Dorsal and ventral roots Dorsal root ventral root Spinal nerve
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Ulnar Nerve and Brachial Plexus Nerve plexuses: 1. Cervical plexus 2. Brachial plexus 3. Lumbar plexus 4. Sacral plexus
Background image of page 8
Flow Chart of Brachial Plexus
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Spinal Cord 1) Serves as a link for transmission of signals between the brain and body: Ascending afferent (cord to brain) nerve tracts Descending efferent (brain to cord) nerve tracts 2) Integrating reflex activity between afferent input and efferent output without involving the brain (spinal reflexes) 3) Central pattern generators (CPGs)
Background image of page 10
Gross Structure of the Spinal Cord
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Spinal Cord 1) Serves as a link for transmission of signals between the brain and body: Ascending afferent (cord to brain) nerve tracts Descending efferent (brain to cord) nerve tracts 2) Integrating reflex activity between afferent input and efferent output without involving the brain (spinal reflexes) 3) Central pattern generators (CPGs)
Background image of page 12
Specializations of the Spinal Cord (Fig. 9-7, p. 302) Posterior (dorsal) column Anterior column foot, leg, trunk, neck, arm, hand -Tactile sensations Anterolateral column - pain sensation - proprioception ss vs vm sm
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Spinal Cord Also Acts as Integrating Center for Spinal Reflexes (Fig. 13-8, p. 456)
Background image of page 14
Central Pattern Generators (CPGs) Neural networks within spinal cord that endogenously generate periodic motor commands for highly patterned, rhythmic movements (e.g. stepping, chewing, scratching) Intrinsic, oscillating pacemaker neuron?
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Brainstem Oldest and most primitive region of brain Consists of: Midbrain, pons and medulla oblongata Third and fourth ventricles 1) Reticular formation – controls arousal, sleep/wake cycles 2) Ascending and descending nerve tracts 3) Nuclei controlling involuntary survival functions 4) Extrapyramidal motor nuclei
Background image of page 16
Brainstem (Cont.) Medulla oblongata Ascending and descending nerve tracts
Background image of page 17

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 18
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/14/2010 for the course BIO Anatomy taught by Professor Findell during the Spring '10 term at University of Texas at Austin.

Page1 / 40

Lecture 13 - CNS Anatomy and Function Bio416K Spring 2010 -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 18. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online