{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

MASC575_Lecture_17_110806

MASC575_Lecture_17_110806 - M(15636” 2000 300 50#istep...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: M (15636” 2000 300 50 #istep, istable, iprint 1 0 1 #ini_new, iscale_x, iscale_v {a was 0.0 1.557 #req_temp,xlcd 8 8 8 # ncell(3) v”- m meme y 37 El 0 100 0.5 #isquench,iquench,coeff_quench istep is the # of time steps, istable specifies after which step we start calculating properties iprint means the program will print properties per so many steps. iniflnew (1 if generating new system, 0 if reading in from file) iscale_x (1 if scaling x, 0 no scaling), iscale,v(1 if scaling v, 0 no scaling) reqmtemp is the preset temperature and xlcd is the lattice constant. They determine the initial x and v scale if iscaleflx = 1 or iscale_v = 1. ncell(3) are the numbers of unit cells in x, y, z direction. Their product shouldn't exceed 2500 and it has no effect when ini__new=0. isquench (1 it quenching, 0 no quenching), iquench is the # of steps between quenching, and coeff__quench is the quenching coefficient. 277* 3'55? -—-— 0200013®3£>ct 050 ® Assignment 1: With xlcd = 1.557, compute the following: E .vs. T P versus T Cv versus T » BO (Mean square displacement for solid) or D(Diffusion constant for liquid) versus T Detailed procedure (with the program already compiled and a.out in the same folder with md.in): a) Create a new folder called x0. Copy a.out and md.in here. Generate a new system using the following parameters in md.in: x 94:? 200W V N -Q_ JT/éjoia 1.557 -\) 53‘“ S\ X / 7 7 7 O 100 O.54\)aw..L . L m b) Create within folder x0 a new directory called 0.3 (or any number that an, represents the new temperature you will scale the system to), and copy a.out, md.in and xvconf from last run into that directory. Note the new directory is necessary so that some important output files will not get overwritten. Now scale the system's temperature using the following parameters (here those numbers that need to be changed from last step are underlined): \ When this run is finished, thermalize the system using the following parameters: 10000 5000 50 O O Q 0.3 1.557 7 7 7 O 100 0.5 Take down the final temperature and pressure and energy after the run is over. Now without changing anything, run the same thing again. After this run is over, compare the final temperature, pressure and energy with last run. if the difference is rather large (> 0.1%), run again with the same parameters until the results converge. Otherwise, these are your final results for a thermalized state. You have one data point of (T1, E1, P1, Cv1). c) Now create within x0 a new directory called 0.6 (or any number that represents the new temperature you will scale the system to), and copy a.out, md.in and xvconf from last run’s directory (0.3) into the new directory. Now scale the system to the new temperature using the following parameters: 10000 5000 50 0 0 1 Q._6_ 1.557 7 7 7 0 100 0.5 When this run is finished, thermalize the system using the following parameters: 10000 5000 50 0 0 0 0.6 1.557 7 7 7 0 100 0.5 Take down the final temperature and pressure and energy after the run is over. Now without changing anything, run the same thing again. After this run is over, compare the final temperature, pressure and energy with last run. if the difference is rather large (> 0.1%), run again with the same parameters until the results converge. Otherwise, these are your final results for a thermalized state. You have another data point of (T2, E2, P2, CV2). d) Repeat the same process while increase the corresponding T by 0.3 or 0.4 each time. i.e., change the 0.6 in last step to 0.9, 1.2, etc... e) After you repeat the procedure with T finally reaches 3.0, you have got about 10 data points. Now you can plot the graphs of E, P, Cv .vs. T using these data. About B .vs. T, go to each directory we saved along the way, and copy the data saved in file ‘meansqdisp’. Inside, the first column is time, and the second column is mean square displacement. You can plot the mean square displacements for F_____ VVVVVV a ,- different temperatures as functions of time in one graph (see the gnuplot tutorial Kenichi sent you or use Excel and merge different data series into a single chart). Also you can determine the diffusion coefficients from the slope of each curve’s linear region, as a function of temperature. Assignment 2: To determine the thermal expansion coefficient of the system: We already know that P=0 for xlcd=1.557 at T=0. f) Now increase the lattice constant by 0.03. Create a new directory called x1 on the same level with x0. Repeat what we did in assignment 1 from step a, except that all the 1.557s in the md.in file are replaced by 1.587, and you will only need to try 4 or 5 different Ts. What we want is P as a function of T. T doesn’t have to go up to 3.0 but it should be high enough to give positive pressure values (the closer P is to 0 the better). After we have some data points, we can extrapolate the point where the curve intersects P=0 with either linear extrapolation (using two closest points to the P=0 axis) or quadratic extrapolation (using 3 or more points). Take down the xlcd and T values that correspond to that P=0 point. g) increase the lattice constant by 0.03 again. Repeat last step and get another P=0 point. Take down the corresponding xlcd and T values again. h) Repeat the last step by increasing xlcd by 0.03 each time. After you have enough data point, draw a plot of xlcd?’ .vs. T, and you would be able to determine the expansion coefficient from the graph. ...
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern