Ch3 - 3.39 Consider the energy levels shown in Figure 3.40....

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3.1 Consider Figure 3.4b, which shows the energy-band splitting of silicon. If the equilibrium lattice spacing were to change by a small amount, discuss how you would expect the electrical properties of silicon to change. Determine at what point the material would behave like an insulator or like a metal. 3.13 Two possible conduction bands are shown in the E versus k diagram given in Figure 3.34. State which band will result in the heavier electron effective mass; state why. 3.35 Show that the probability of an energy state being occupied E above the Fermi energy is the same as the probability of a state being empty E below the Fermi level. 3.36 (a) Determine for what energy above E F (in terms of kT) the Fermi-Dirac probability function is within 1 percent of the Boltzmann approximation. (b) Give the value of the probability function at this energy.
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Unformatted text preview: 3.39 Consider the energy levels shown in Figure 3.40. Let T = 300 K. (a) If E 1 E F = 0.30 eV, determine the probability that an energy state at E = E 1 is occupied by an electron and the probability that an energy state at E = E 2 is empty. (b) Repeat part (a) if E F E 2 = 0.40 eV. 3.42 Assume the Fermi energy level is exactly in the center of the bandgap energy of a semiconductor at T = 300 K. (a) Calculate the probability that an energy state in the bottom of the conduction band is occupied by an electron for Si, Ge, and GaAs. (b) Calculate the probability that an energy state in the top of the valence band is empty for Si, Ge, and GaAs. 3.43 Calculate the temperature at which there is a 10-6 probability that an energy state 0.55 eV above the Fermi energy level is occupied by an electron....
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Ch3 - 3.39 Consider the energy levels shown in Figure 3.40....

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