7-lecture6 - Cairo University Electronics and...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Cairo University Electronics and Communications Engineering Technical English, Lecture 6: Technical writing Hossam A. H. Fahmy c 2007 2 Numbers Numbers are important in technical documents. • Be accurate. – “The forward bias voltage of a diode is small .” (How small is small? Should it be the voltage across the diode?) – “Digital disks are better than the analog ones.” (In what? By how much?) • Compare the same dimensions. “The value of R is twice that of C.” • Use a small space to separate groups of three digits in a number: 123 456 and not a comma 123 , 456. (Note the difference between 123 , 456 and 123 , 456. The latter is two numbers separated by a comma.) • Insert a ‘0’ before the fractional point for numbers between -1 and 1: 0 . 53 not . 53. 3 Objects, properties, and values Watch out for the difference between a resistor and a resistance, a capacitor and a capacitance. A resistor is soldered, a resistance is measured, and the value of the resistance is 470 ohms. 4 Additions Parallel work adds in one sense but not the other. Two students working together on a project for a week • produce more work than another student working alone for the same week, but • each gets a work experience of one week not two! 5 Zero and infinity In calculations, engineers often neglect some terms if they are much smaller than other terms. These are “zeros” while very large terms are “infinities”. • Remember that in reality these are not the mathematical zero or infinity. • In a lab measurement or in a simulation, you will never have a zero or infinity....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 04/09/2010 for the course ELECT. ENG 607 taught by Professor Hossamfahmy during the Spring '09 term at Cairo University.

Page1 / 19

7-lecture6 - Cairo University Electronics and...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online