Lecture 8 with ink

Lecture 8 with ink - Lecture 8 NMR Spectroscopy recap...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture 8 NMR Spectroscopy recap Liquid Chromatography Gas Chromatography Introduction to Mass Spectrometry Experiment 8 1H nuclei that are the same show up the same in the NMR Integration Intensity of peak (area underneath signal) proportional to number of protons plitting (signal to signal interaction) Splitting (signal to signal interaction) Use the N+1 rule N = number of hydrogens on the adjacent carbon..not other atoms! If N = 1then according to the rule the splitting pattern equals 2, or a doublet If N = 2then the splitting is 3, or a triplet Splitting Patterns and Coupling N+1 rule gives splitting Splitting intensity governed by Pascal's Triangle Ethyl acetate vs. Methyl propanoate So what does NMR tell us?? Number of protons on the molecule What kind of atoms the protons are attached to he number of adjacent protons The number of adjacent protons This is an extremely powerful tool!!! So how do you explain the position of alkene aromatic, or aldehyde protons? Anisotropy- orbitals do not have spherical cloud orbital creates mag field perpendicular to 1H axis orbital creates mag field perpendicular to 1H axis Symmetry If there is a plane of symmetry, the mirrored nuclei appear at identical chemical shift (invisible) identical branching, they show up the same If identical branching, they show up the same...
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This note was uploaded on 04/09/2010 for the course CHEM 6a taught by Professor Pettus during the Winter '07 term at UCSB.

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Lecture 8 with ink - Lecture 8 NMR Spectroscopy recap...

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