Week2A_1 - Today and Tuesday The consonants of German...

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Today and Tuesday • The consonants of German • Stammtisch (Ich werde wohl dabei sein.) at The Stand on Westwood Blvd., a couple of blocks up from Wilshire (east side). • Tues.: vowels and begin ch. 2. • Note to me: bring data cord 4/13/2009 1
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4/13/2009 2 The phonetics of German The consonants Worksheets 1-3 due after this lecture.
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4/13/2009 3 To begin, what’s the difference between a consonant and a vowel ? • With consonants there is some sort of obstruction in the mouth or a narrowing of the vocal track so that there is audible friction. • Typically, vowels are syllabic and consonants are not.
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4/13/2009 4 What is a glide? • Sort of in between these! • A.k.a. semi-vowel. A consonant , but one without the usual phonetic characteristics associated with consonants. A manner of articulation. • Examples in English include [j] as in y es and [w] as in w ater . German j a!
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4/13/2009 5 Where does the air come from when making sounds? • Give me a break! • Not as easy as it sounds. Because it’s not just from the lungs! But from: ¾ the lungs, glottis, and velum.
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4/13/2009 6 If from the lungs, then… • Pulmonic egressive sounds (most), OR • Pulmonic ingressive??? (NOT) – Northern European yes.
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4/13/2009 7 If from the glottis, then… • Glottalic sounds – two kinds: – Ejectives: p’ t’ k’ – Injectives: ɓɗɠ That’s b ad. He’s g ood. That’s d umb. A native Oklahoman speaking his patois
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4/13/2009 8 If from the velum, then… • They are called velaric suction sounds. Also known as clicks . • Found only in some West African languages, like !Xosa. • A “kiss” is a bilabial click = [ ʘ ].
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4/13/2009 9 Since there are no injectives , ejectives and clicks in German • I won’t test you over these. • But they are interesting, aren’t they?
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4/13/2009 10 Now to our descriptions. Remember, we use the speech organs to describe the sounds. With consonants there are only three criteria : i. Place of articulation ii. Voice iii. Manner of articulation
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4/13/2009 11 PLACE: where is a [b] as in b ee pronounced? Right! At the lips. For this reason, it is called a bilabial . But it gets a little harder.
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4/13/2009 12 Now think about the sound [f], as in English f ee. What is articulating against what? • The lower lip is articulating against the
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This note was uploaded on 04/10/2010 for the course GERMAN 141 taught by Professor Stevens during the Spring '10 term at UCLA.

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Week2A_1 - Today and Tuesday The consonants of German...

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