Chapter 5 - Short Run Chapter 5 Elasticity 5 Long Run...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 5 Elasticity                LEARNING OBJECTIVES:   By the end of this chapter, students should understand:   Ø the meaning of the elasticity of demand.   Ø what determines the elasticity of demand.   Ø the meaning of the elasticity of supply.   Short Run Long Run 5 ELASTICITY AND ITS APPLICATION
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Ø what determines the elasticity of supply.   Ø the concept of elasticity in three very different markets (the market for wheat, the market for oil, and the  market for illegal drugs).       CONTEXT AND PURPOSE:   Chapter 5 is the second chapter of a three-chapter sequence that deals with supply and demand and how markets  work.  Chapter 4 introduced supply and demand.  Chapter 5 shows how much buyers and sellers respond to changes  in market conditions.  Chapter 6 will address the impact of government polices on competitive markets.       The purpose of Chapter 5 is to add precision to the supply-and-demand model.  We introduce the concept of  elasticity, which measures the responsiveness of buyers and sellers to changes in economic variables such as prices  and income.  The concept of elasticity allows us to make quantitative observations about the impact of changes in  supply and demand on equilibrium prices and quantities.      
Background image of page 2
KEY POINTS:   1.       The price elasticity of demand measures how much the quantity demanded responds to changes in the  price.  Demand tends to be more elastic if close substitutes are available, if the good is a luxury rather than a  necessity, if the market is narrowly defined, or if buyers have substantial time to react to a price change.   2.       The price elasticity of demand is calculated as the percentage change in quantity demanded divided by the  percentage change in price.  If the elasticity is less than one, so that quantity demanded moves proportionately  less than the price, demand is said to be inelastic.  If the elasticity is greater than one, so that quantity demanded  moves proportionately more than the price, demand is said to be elastic.   3.       Total revenue, the total amount paid for a good, equals the price of the good times the quantity sold.  For  inelastic demand curves, total revenue rises as price rises.  For elastic demand curves, total revenue falls as price  rises.   4.       The income elasticity of demand measures how much the quantity demanded responds to changes in  consumers’ income.  The cross-price elasticity of demand measures how much the quantity demanded of one  good responds to the price of another good.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 29

Chapter 5 - Short Run Chapter 5 Elasticity 5 Long Run...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online