psy265_appendix_b - testicles rise even closer to the body...

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Axia College Material Appendix B Sexual Response Cycles Use your own words to complete the table below with the experiences and changes in anatomy of males and females during the various sexual response phases. Stage of Masters and Johnson Sexual Response Cycle Male Experience and Anatomy Female Experience and Anatomy Excitement Phase The penis becomes partially erect within seconds. The testicles draw upward, and the scrotum can tense and thicken. The breasts become enlarged, and the nipples harden. The Libra majora becomes flatter, thinner, and rises upward and outward. The clitoral gland becomes swollen. The vaginal wall expands and becomes lubricated. Plateau Phase The urethral sphincter contracts and the muscles at the base of the penis begin and steady rhythmic contractions. The penis secretes seminal fluid and the
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Unformatted text preview: testicles rise even closer to the body. The areola and libia further increase in size, the clitoris withdraws slightly, and the Bartholin gland produces more lubrication. Tissues of the outer vigina swell, muscles tighten, creating the orgasmic platform. Orgasmic Phase The male ejaculation is felt especially in the penis and loins. Other sensations can be felt in the lower back. The first and second orgasms are the most felt. The muscular spasms aide in the locomotion of sperm up the vaginal wall into the uterus. Resolution Phase Allows muscles to relax, blood pressure to drop, and the body to slow down. They may find continued stimulation extremely painful. Women may not have a refractory period and may be able to repeat the cycle almost immediately. PSY 265...
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This note was uploaded on 04/10/2010 for the course PSY/265 PSY/265 taught by Professor Axiacollege during the Spring '09 term at University of Phoenix.

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