HIV AIDA+ - HIV/AIDS An Overview 1 HIV/AIDS An Overview...

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HIV/AIDS: An Overview 1 HIV/AIDS: An Overview Mary Clary HCA 240 Shelia Pierson April 4, 2010
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HIV/AIDS: An Overview 2 Abstract “There have been in excess of 980,000 cases of AIDS reported in the United States to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention since 1981. As stated by the Center for Disease Control, (2009), greater than 1,000,000 Americans may be infected with HIV; one-quarter of these Americans are oblivious to their infection” (HIV Infection and AIDS, n.d.). There is a discrepancy when looking at the figures of the individuals affected by HIV and AIDS. The lack of knowledge to understand the differences of the two related terms can be confusing. Individuals can be HIV infected without having AIDS; but have the chance of later developing AIDS. However; all individuals who are infected with AIDS are also infected with HIV. The Difference between HIV and AIDS HIV and AIDS are two general terms that are recognized worldwide. HIV is the abbreviation for Human Immunodeficiency Virus while AIDS stands for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. These terms are simple, yet complex in their individual meanings. Using the cause and effect rule is the simplest method to remember the differences between the two terms; HIV is the cause while AIDS is the effect. Unlike other commonly known viruses, HIV is a virus which has extremely unusual characteristics. HIV is capable of destroying the host’s immune system focusing on the killer cells which are important components of the third line of the body’s defense. The killer cells associated to HIV include the T helper and the CD4 cells. (Overview, n.d.) As components of the body’s immune system, these cells contained in white blood cells, are responsible for defending the body against any foreign
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HIV/AIDS: An Overview 3 attacks. HIV is not destroying the important components of the body’s immune system purposely but the destructive effects are just secondary to the viruses’ struggles to obtain a sustainable stay within the host’s system. The disruptive effects however; cause the immune system to fail in differentiating foreign bodies that it even attacks its own components leading to the development of AIDS (Aids.gov, 2009). Various ways HIV can be transmitted Although HIV can be acquired instantaneously it is highly unusual for AIDS to develop immediately. While HIV infection is the first stage, AIDS occurs as the final stage. It may take months or even years for the HIV infection to develop into AIDS, even though it can only take seconds upon exposure to acquire HIV. The implication that the HIV infection has produced substantial effects to the host’s
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This note was uploaded on 04/10/2010 for the course HCA 240 PSY/265 taught by Professor Axiacollege during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

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HIV AIDA+ - HIV/AIDS An Overview 1 HIV/AIDS An Overview...

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