Pentose Phosphate Pathway

Pentose Phosphate Pathway - Pentose Phosphate Pathway Aka...

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Pentose Phosphate Pathway Aka the Hexose Monophosphate Shunt Bryant Miles In most animal tissues, glucose is catabolized via the glycolytic pathway into two molecules of pyruvate. Pyruvate is then oxidized via the citric acid cycle to generate ATP. There is another metabolic fate for glucose used to generate NADPH and specialized products needed by the cell. This pathway is called the pentose phosphate pathway . Some text books call it the hexose monophosphate shunt, still others call it the phosphogluconate pathway. In this class, we will call it the pentose phosphate pathway. The pentose phosphate pathway produces NADPH which is the universal reductant in anabolic pathways. In mammals the tissues requiring large amounts of NADPH produced by this pathway are the tissues that synthesize fatty acids and steroids such as the mammary glands, adipose tissue, adrenal cortex and the liver. Tissues less active in fatty acid synthesis such as skeletal muscle are virtually lacking the pentose phosphate pathway. The second function of the pentose phosphate pathway is to generate pentoses, particularly ribose which is necessary for the synthesis of nucleic acids. It is convenient to think of the pentose phosphate pathway as operating in two phases. The first phase is the oxidative phase. Two of the first three reactions of the first phase generate NADPH. The second phase is the nonoxidative phase. In the first step glucose-6-phosphate is oxidized into ribulose-5-phosphate, CO 2 . During the oxidation of glucose-6-phosphate NADP + is reduced into NADPH. The second step of the pathway coverts the ribulose 5-phosphate into other pentose-5- phosphates including ribose-5-phosphate used to synthesize nucleic acids.
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This note was uploaded on 04/11/2010 for the course BICH bich 411 taught by Professor Bryantmiles during the Spring '10 term at Texas A&M.

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Pentose Phosphate Pathway - Pentose Phosphate Pathway Aka...

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