PeriodicTableF09

PeriodicTableF09 - Lab 4: Totally, Terrific Table!...

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Lab 4: Totally, Terrific Table! Objective The goals of this experiment are: To observe the reactions of several metals with cold water, hot water, acids, and other metal ions. To prepare an activity series of the metals based on the observations from the above reactions. Grading You will be assessed on: Observations of the reactions of several metals with cold water, hot water, acids and then other metal ions. Preparation of an activity series of the metals based on the observations from the above reactions. Answers to the post-lab questions. Background Information First, you are going to travel back to 1869 and marvel at how the first periodic law and table were born when only 63 elements had been discovered at the time. A 35 year old professor of general chemistry, Dmitri Ivanovich Mendeleev, at the University of St. Petersburg (now Lennigrad) in Russia was shuffling cards, each labeled with the property of an element, trying to organize his thoughts for his soon-to-be famous textbook on chemistry. He realized that if the elements were arranged in the order of their atomic weights, there was a trend in properties that repeated itself several times! In order to see and find order among the elements, we must have some general acquaintance with them. Elements are made of matter, and matter is defined as anything that has mass and occupies space. This includes everything that you can see and a lot that you cannot. It follows that in order to distinguish between different types of matter (in other words different elements) we have to assess their properties. There are two types of properties: intensive and extensive. In the former case, intensive properties do not depend on the how much of an element is present but do include state (whether a substance is a solid, liquid or gas), color and chemical reactivity. Extensive properties depend on the quantity of matter present; mass and volume are extensive properties. Properties can be further categorized as either chemical or physical. A chemical change
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PeriodicTableF09 - Lab 4: Totally, Terrific Table!...

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