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shopping addiction paper

shopping addiction paper - Imagine working a twelve hour...

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Imagine working a twelve hour shift, daily for six days a week. You rarely spend quality time with your friends and family because your job is one of your top priorities. Then imagine spending all the money that you make, after working so hard, on a shopping spree, for every single pay check. The only money that you have left over, is just enough to pay for rent or sometimes to pay for gas, some times not even that much. You can’t help yourself but to spend your money on items, mostly items that are not even necessities in your life. It may seem normal to you, as people enjoy spending their money on shopping but imagine if this enjoyment causes you to go bankrupt, homeless even? Addictions do not always have to be related to drugs. People can very well be addicted to things such as gambling, chewing gum, exercise, sex, video games, shopping , working (behavioral addictions), etc… (Griffiths 1997) . Being addicted to shopping can impact ones life majorly as well as the people in the addict’s life. This literature review is necessary because it will shed further light on the relationship between working and a shopping addiction (compulsive shopping/spending). Watch your thoughts; they become words. Watch your words; they become actions. Watch your actions; they become habits. Watch your habits; they become character. Watch your character; it becomes your destiny. I do strongly believe that addiction begins with a simple thought. The term " addiction " is used in many contexts to describe an obsession, compulsion, or excessive psychological dependence. Marlatt et al. (1988, p. 224) defines addictive behavior as: a repetitive habit pattern that increases the risk of disease and/or associated personal and social problems. Addictive behaviors are often experienced subjectively as ‘‘loss of control’’ – the behavior contrives to occur despite volitional attempts to abstain or moderate use. These habit patterns are typically characterized by immediate gratification (short-term reward), often
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coupled with delayed deleterious effects (long-term costs). Attempts to change an addictive behavior (via treatment or self-initiation) are typically marked with high relapse rates. I feel as though nobody takes his first drink, pops her first pill, or snorts her first line thinking, “I plan on getting hooked on this.” Instead, people tend to think things like this: “addiction happens to other people.” “Addicts are homeless people who live in the gutter.” “Only weak willed people get addicted,” or “If I feel myself starting to get addicted, I’ll stop.” To a person who has never experienced addiction, it can be hard to understand, frustrating, even irritating. We sometimes want to ask, “Why didn’t they just stop? This stuff was ruining their lives, couldn’t they see that?” Every day further into an addiction, an addict loses a little more— more time, more self-respect, and more opportunities.
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