CHEM%20140L%20Session%2001

CHEM%20140L%20Session%2001 - Session 01 Introduction to...

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1-1 Session 01 Introduction to Excel - Spreadsheet Basics Topics In this session the following spreadsheet concepts will be explored: 1. What is a Spreadsheet? 2. Understanding the Worksheet Excel keyboard shortcuts 3. Entering Data on a Worksheet Entering text and numbers Copying and Moving Data Switching between Worksheets and Workbooks 4. Creating a Formula Rules for entering formulas Copying values and formulas 5. Creating a Chart Creating a Scatter chart Changing a Chart’s Location Adding and Editing Chart Data Series 6. Formatting the Worksheet Widening a column Formatting cells Preparing worksheets for printing Formatting cells 7. Formatting a Chart Changing lines and markers Changing Plot Area colour 8. Saving, Previewing and Printing a Worksheet Saving a worksheet Previewing a worksheet Printing a worksheet
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CHEM 140L Session 1 - An Introduction to Excel - Spreadsheet Basics 1-2 What is a Spreadsheet? A spreadsheet is a rectangular grid of cells that can be used to collect and calculate data. The user may enter information (data) in the spreadsheet into the columns and rows of a working area called a worksheet. The user may utilize the many features of the spreadsheet to work on the data. For example, to figure totals, calculate formulas, sort information, and so on. Most spreadsheet applications have the ability to create graphics such as charts and plots, that allows the user to translate the data in the spreadsheet into visual representations. A spreadsheet allows the user to ask the question, “What if. ..?”. The spreadsheet will help the user find the answers. As soon as an amount or change is made to a spreadsheet's worksheet, the spreadsheet calculates the effect on all affected variables. The spreadsheet can be programmed to display text or to do algebraic calculations. For example, the spreadsheet shown in the previous illustration has the phrase, “An Example” in cell A1 and the numbers 3.1897 and 2 in cells A3 and B3, respectively. Cell C3 has been programmed with an algebraic formula, A3*B3, directing the computer to multiply the numbers in A3 and B3 and place the answer in cell C3. If the numbers in A3 or B3 are changed, the number in C3 is changed automatically.
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CHEM 140L Session 1 - An Introduction to Excel - Spreadsheet Basics 1-3 Understanding the Worksheet The Excel worksheet has 65536 rows and 256 columns. The columns are labelled from left to right, beginning with A through Z. After Z, labelling continues with AA through AZ, then BA through BZ and so on through column IV. On a new worksheet, the active cell is A1 (the intersection of column A and row 1). A1 is call the cell reference , which is the combination of the column letter and row number. For example, the cell at the intersection of column D and row 5 has the cell reference D5.
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CHEM%20140L%20Session%2001 - Session 01 Introduction to...

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