HRVA_Application

HRVA_Application - APPLICATION OF HRVA MODEL TO 1998 ICE...

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APPLICATION OF HRVA MODEL TO 1998 ICE STORM
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OBJECTIVE OF HRVA To help a community make risk-based choices to address vulnerabilities, mitigate hazards and prepare for response to and recovery from hazard events. MAIN STEPS ARE: Steps 3 (gather relevant risk information), Step 4 (hazard and vulnerability identification) and Step 5 (Risk analysis). Risk information checklist on page 3-2 is an example of variety of information you will need to identify vulnerabilities, consequence severity and likelihood related to your chosen hazard. It doesn’t mean that you have to have all those maps that are listed there – do your best to find USEFUL/RELEVANT information to apply HRVA method for risk assessment and analysis.
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Quebec Ice Storm 1998 (Focus on Montreal City): On January 5-10 1998, the most devastating and catastrophic ice storm in Canadian history occurred. Many regions were caught in the storm including; Atlantic Canada (the Maritimes), Eastern Ontario and Southern Quebec. However, many regions were hit more severely then others, one particular location were the city of Montreal which was hit quite severely. The rapid urbanization and growing population of the city made it extremely vulnerable to this disastrous event. Some useful resources: http://www.publicsafety.gc.ca/res/em/cdd/index-eng.aspx http://www.unisdr.org/disaster-statistics/introduction.htm http://en.wikipedia.org http://www.usgs.gov/ http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ed-ud/index-eng.php http://gsc.nrcan.gc.ca/floods/database_e.php
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Gather Risk Information City of Montreal: The City of Montreal is the second-largest city in Canada and the largest city in the province of Quebec. The City‘s 49,600 hectares or 496 kilometers are home to a population of 1.8 million people. There are 3,629 inhabitants per square kilometer. The industrial sector is made up of approximately 3,000 large, midsized, and small firms. About 180 of these firms process, produce, or store hazardous materials. In case of a hazardous event these industrial firms become prone to the possibility of industrial accidents, which would be hazard which, in the event of a major industrial accident, would threaten the health or life of citizens living in their vicinity. (Transport, 2003) Death Toll 28 Injured 945 Evacuated 600, 000 Estimated Cost $5, 410, 184, 000 Communities Affected 200 plus Regions Affected New Burnswick, Eastern Ontario, Quebec
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Severely Affected Areas Areas affected by power outage are marked in red Accumulation of ice in Montreal and surrounding areas due to prolonged freezing rain
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Vulnerability Vulnerability is defined as people, property, infrastructure, industry and resources, or environments that are particularly exposed to adverse impact from a hazard event. There are four groups of
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This note was uploaded on 04/11/2010 for the course ADMS 3701 taught by Professor Nirunirupama during the Fall '09 term at York University.

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HRVA_Application - APPLICATION OF HRVA MODEL TO 1998 ICE...

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