14lecture1780frankenstein09SU

14lecture1780frankenstein09SU - SchoolofArtsandLetters

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1 School of Arts and Letters Atkinson Faculty of Liberal and Professional Studies Summer 2009 AK/HUMA 1780 6.0A Stories in Diverse Media Announcements: You will get your essay back on Wednesday or Thursday this week. Distance Education will return it to you via your yorku email account. Please check this email for the essay return. They do not have access to any other email (hotmail, gmail, yahoo, etc.), even if you have used it to communicate with them or me. Your midterm tests will be returned early next week by the same method. Variations on a Scream: Two Versions of Frankenstein So today is comparison day. We will examine two film versions of Frankenstein from the multitude of adaptations that have occurred since Shelley’s novel was first printed. We will focus on four important elements that I touched on last day from Shelley’s novel, although there are many more comparisons one could make: the two main characters, Victor Frankenstein and the Creature, as well as the creation scene and that strange phenomenon, the bride of Frankenstein. First, we need to collect some descriptors for the characters of Victor Frankenstein and the Creature, strictly from the novel. If you would like to test yourself, do this on your own and then check my list to see how it compares.
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2 Victor Frankenstein Melodramatic—“Great God!” is his fixed epithet. Tormented Ineffective Pathetic Obsessed Mad ¾ But how would you describe his madness? Is he sinister? Evil? Malicious? ± I would suggest, no. He seems to be more victimized than spiteful (unlike Salome). ± He is obsessed almost despite himself, a "good guy" who just does the wrong thing. This will change in the first film we will view. The Creature Articulate Physically strong At first, good natured, but by the end, vengeful Innocent Is he malevolent? ¾ Again, no. He is much more complicated than that.
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3 This is how Shelley describes the Creature: “his hair was of a lustrous black, and flowing, his teeth of pearly whiteness; but these luxuriances only formed a more horrid contrast with his watery eyes, that seemed almost of the same colour as the dun white sockets in which they were set, his shriveled complexion and straight black lips” (58). That is about the extent of the description. Shelley leaves the horror of the monster’s looks largely up to the imagination of the reader. Frankenstein, for example, mentions they are ghastly but not much more: “I had gazed on him while unfinished; he was ugly then; but when those muscles and joints were rendered capable of motion, it became a thing such as even Dante could not have conceived” (59). Dante is famous for his literary
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This note was uploaded on 04/11/2010 for the course HUMA 1780 taught by Professor Eliciaclements during the Summer '09 term at York University.

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14lecture1780frankenstein09SU - SchoolofArtsandLetters

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