Test 3KEY - 1. Why do we typically prefer to use monoclonal...

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1. Why do we typically prefer to use monoclonal antibodies? What is the major drawback of monoclonal antibodies? How are monoclonal antibodies made? (Keep it general – no more detail than was given in lecture.) With monoclonal Ab, we can be sure that the binding site and affinity will be constant since every Ab will be identical. Major drawbacks – time to make and cost, only binds a single epitope. Made by fusing a B cell that produces the desired Ab with a lymphoma cell to make the cell line immortal. 2. You have just prepared a monoclonal antibody that has a very high affinity for your favorite protein. Your protein has three different subunits (10 kDa, 25 kDa, and 55 kDa), and you need to know which subunit binds your new antibody. What is a simple way to determine this? Run the protein on a denaturing SDS gel. (This is the normal SDS-PAGE procedure, including a reducing agent like β -mercaptoethanol, which will break apart protein subunits.) Be sure to include size markers. Perform a Western blot with your antibody
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Test 3KEY - 1. Why do we typically prefer to use monoclonal...

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